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THE

OR,

WEEKLY

VISITOR.

FOR THE USE AND AMUSEMENT OF BOTH SEXES.

VOL. XII.)

Saturday, March 30.... 1811.

(no. 23.

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ed them to Pistoye, where THE

they were to pass the night, MONK OF THE GROTTO.

and from thence to go post to

Rome. She easily discovered A Tale.

the light blue habit of her lover

and his dark brown hair, which (Continued)

flowed down his shoulders, and While he was thus saying, wantoned in the breeze. The he repeatedly turned round to soul of Virginia was concentracatch alast glimpse of Virginia, ted in her eyes, which seemed who, supported on the arm of rivetted to that object, the the Marchioness, and followed source at once of her joy and by 'the Marquis, had

sorrow. She scarce dared to reached the door of the hall. breath ; she pressed one hand Scarce had Eugenio disappeared

to her heart, and with the other to her eyes, than sheuttered an applied her handkerchief to involuntary shriek, and rush. her eyes, to dry the flood of ed with precipitation up s:airs,

tears that escaped her, in spite nor stopped till she had arived of all her efforts to the contraat the platform of the tower, in ry. She blessed the intricate which her apartment was situ and difficult path through which ated ;-there she rested against Eugenio pursued his journey; one of the battlements, and tra but who can describe the excess versed with her eyes the im

of her emotion when she saw mense tract of country which bin suddenly stop his horse, lay beneath her feet. She per and cast a wishful look back to ceived three men on horseback,

the Castle. whom she soon recognized as Eugenio, his Gyoernor, and a Powerful magic of Love ! he servant. They were proceed had at that moment distin. ing along one of the defiles of guished Virginia, though at the Apennines, which conduct such a distance, and alighting

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from his horse, extended 'is Eugenio, heaved a deep sigh, right hand towards her, Vir.

and descended to her apartgin a wared) er handkerchief, ment. She threw herself on moist with her tears, and en the bed, where the excess of joved the enrapturing idea, !!

her agitation would not allow that her soulstill con municated

her to taste the sweets of re. with that of her dear Eugenio;

pose; at lergth, exhausted by hot soon the last rars of the lier grief, a few short and in. setting sun w re succeeded hy terrupted slumhers suspended the lengthened shadows that for a while the dreadful and obscured the Apennine moun.

foreboding thoughts that op tains. The bright star of day

pressed her heart. had already disappeared, and Virginia could no longer pe

Let us now leave for a time Berate the light vaponrs with

the tender and lovely Virgiwhich the approach of evening nia, abandoned to gloomy and overspread the surrounding consuming sorrow. Each day horizon.

she visited the sad scenes but

late embellished with the preAbsorded in melancholy, sence of Eugenio-ow, alas! and enjoying the profound so. to her sight obscured by that litude that reigned around her, melancholy tint which ever she remained a full houron the pervades the inanimate obspot where she stood, leaning ljects of former delight, and her head against a buttress of renders tbemn the mute remem. the battlement. A cold and brancers of the pleasures they bleak wind arose, and whist retrace.--Let us now return ling along the winding staircase to Eugenio. of the tower, agitated the shrubs that had taken root in the inter No less afflicted than Virgi. stices of the stones that formed nia, but at the same time impa. the building; the heavy flight tient to arrive at Rome, in orof night birds, their shrill and der that he might the sooner ill-omened cries startled her, return to receive the sweet reand produced an emotion of ward, of which the promise of terror, which roused her from his moiher had assured him, he the painful state of lethargy in could scarce support the tediwhich she was plunged. She ousness of his jouruey; bis turned her eyes towards the mind, wholly abstracıed by spot where she had last beheld the image of her he loved, was

insensible to every other ob towards the palace of his un. ject; he neither saw nor heard cle; and every time the carany thing, answered the ques riage was retarded by the obtions of his Governer by a sin structions of the crowded gle Monosyllable, and repea streets, he looked out to see if edly consulted his conductor he had arrived. as to the distance they had to proceed before they arrived at At last the postchais stopped their journey's end. He scarce

before the Palace of Caprara. allowed himself time to sleep Eugenio, transported with joy, on the road, but employed the immediately leaped out, and greater part of the night in hastened into the court-yard, writing to Virginia. He pain without paying the least attented to her his love, and the re tion to the number of carriages grethe experienced at being with which it was filled. He absent from her. Hiis letters was on the point of en ering the were written in that style of interior of the Palace, when incoherence, and with that dis bis Governor, who had some regard of conection, which is difficulty in following him, ever the characteristic of a vi- suddenly stopped, and entreatolent and unfeigoed passion. ed him to consider that it was At length he found himself in necessary he should repair the the delightful plains with which disorder of his dress, before he Rome is surrounded, and gave presented himself to the Carfree vent to the effusions of his dinal, who, according to every joy.

app arance, had at that time

a number of visitors of the On arriving at that celebra- first rank.-Eugenio reluctantted city, formerly the mistressly suffered himself to be conof the world, he neither remar dicted to the apartment destinked the beauty of its streets ed for him, and found in the and squares, the obelisks with anti-chamber, several servants which it is decorated, nor the who awaited his orders. magnificent architecture of its monuments, which had endur Notwithstanding the distraced for so many ages, and seem tibi of his mind, he was struck ed destined to be the archieves with the magnificence of the of the immortal geniusses who l gallery through which he was had constructed them. His conducted to his bed chamber: thoughts were solely directed pillars of porphyry supported a

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buz of approbation which 356 THE LADY'S MISCELLANY; cornice, on which were ranged

The Cardinal raised him up, bus's and vases of the most pressed him in his arins, and ci ior's workman-hip; pictures spoke to him in the most affecof the greatest masters of the

tionate manner. Italian school every where presented themselves to his sight.

'Come my nephew,' he ex

claimed, 'come; and I will preEugenio seemed more particu. larly delighted with one of

sent you to the company I have them, which represented the just left. Every one is impa

tient to return of Briseis to Achilles ;

see you;--you will

find among them the Count he thought of his loved and ab

Vizzani, your maternal uncle, sent Virginia, and tears moistened his eyes: but soon recover

and the charming Rosalia, his

daughter, who have been these ing the impatience he felt to

two months past at rome. see the Cardinal, he hastened 'to the chamber appointed for

Eugenio fullowed his uncle him, where two servants attend-in silence. The air of dignity ed to assist him in dressing.

which distinguished the Car. Scarce had they finished the dinal's whole figure, added to office with which they were the splendour with which he charged, than the Cardinal was

was surrounded, inspired him announced, who having been

with a certain timidity he found informed of the arrival of Eu

it impossible to overcome ; and genio, had quitted the brelliant

this first interview, which he company assembled at his

had desired with so mnch arhouse, in order to have the dour, passed away without his pleasure of embrasing his de.

having courage sufficient to phew.

pronounce the name of Vir. Eugenio bowed respectfully, ginia. and raised to his lips the hand As they entered the grand the Cardinal presented to him; saloon, the ears of the Cardinal but scarce had he surveyed were struck with the flattering the figure of his uncle, than he was struck with its perfect re spread throughout the assemsemblance to that of his fa- bly. The extreme beauty of ther, yielding to the emotion | Eugenio's figure, the graces of which the likeness produced, his person, and the nobleness he knelt before him, and with of his deportment, excited gedifficulty restrained his tears. neral admiration : the ladies in

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