ページの画像
PDF
ePub

sogged, bushy, and almost imprac- against our left, which, as on the ticable ground. Nothing could be preceding day, was the principal more advantageous than this dif- object of the enemy. The price position of the army, by which the de Soubiseled iheir center and their whole center and right wing were left. The engagement began at covered in front by a river, and the three in the morning, and it was a left supported by rivers on both its severe and continued fire for upflanks. In the left indeed, was the wards of five hours, before the least ftrength and flower of the army ; effect could be perceived on either the count of Lippe had placed also fide. The weight of the attack in this wing, the greatest part of this day lay on Wutgeneau's corps, the artillery, as he knew that it which supported it with a degree defended the most important situa- of bravery, that rivalled the land tion, was the most exposed in front, which had been lately made by the and consequently would be the ob. British forces. But about.nine, the ject of the enemy's most consider. prince discovered that the enemy able efforts.

were preparing to erect batteries on He was not mistaken in his con an eminence, in the front of the jecture. On the 15th of July in marquis of Granby's camp, which the evening, a very furious attack he had not been able to enclofe was made on lord Granby's posts, within his lines. Sensible of the which was fuftained for a long time presing necessity there was of prewith all the intrepidity and form- venting the enemy from feizing on ness which British troops always an eminence, from whence they exert, and which that gallant officer might cruelly gall his army, he knows fu well how to inspire. The called in a reserve, which had been dispofition we have just mentioned, placed at the other side of the Lippe was not then compleated ; fo that under general Sporken. Strengththey had the whole torrent of that ened by this fupply, and encouraged impetuosity, which distinguithes the by the irresolution which now beFrench in their first attacks, to re- gan to appear in the motions of the filt for some hours, until Wutgeneau enemy, be commanded the troops according to the plan originally which were nearest at hand to adprojected, arrived to their asistance, vance upon them. and then with efforts united and This movement was decisive, the redoubled in a long and obstinate enemy gave way, fell into disorcombat, which continued until it der, and retired with precipitation. was quite dark, they repulsed the Their center and left, which had French, and drove them into the not been able to pass the Saltzbach, woods.

after a long and ineffectual canJuly 16th.

By the next morning, nonade, retired with the rest, and

the disposition of the al- covered their retreat ; so that falies was perfelied, and it was evi- voured by this circumstanee, and dent that the French, far from be- the closeness of the country, which ing dismayed by their mistortune, was full of hedges, they marched were prepared for a more general off in tolerable order, and were and better futiained attack than the pursued but a little way. Howformer. M, Broglio commanded ever, their loss was considerable :

the

the regiment of Rouge, confisting of the original superiority of the four battalions, with its cannon French, together with their oppora and colours, was entirely taken by tunity of continual reinforcement, the fingle battalion of Maxwell. may very tolerably explain the reaTheir whole loss in killed, wound- fon of the advantages which they ed, and prisoners, has been esti- so often obtained after very confimated at tive thousand. The allies derable defeats. This is a point had about three hundred killed, a

which it is necessary the reader thousand wounded, and about two should continually keep in his mind hur.dred prisoners. This action during the whole narration of this was the climax of the campaign of strange war. After their late loss 1761, in Wetphalia; it did the and retreat, the French foon adgreatest honour to the wisdom of vanced again. The party under the accomplished commander in the the prince de Soubise passed the difpofition, and to the bravery of Lippe, and made dispositions for the troops in the combat; but it the siege of Munfter, whilst marshal was far from decisive. Notwith Broglio's army turned off on the standing the loss the French fuf- other side, crossed the Weser, and fered, they were still much sape- threatned to fall in upon Hanover. rior in their numbers. On this mis This division of the enemy comfortune the old ill understanding pelled prince Ferdinand, though between Soubise and Broglio broke little in a condition for it, to die out with fresh animosity. Narra. vide his army also. The heredita. tives, memorials, and replies, con ry prince posted himself to cover ceived with great bitterness, were Munster; whilst prince Ferdinand mutually remitted from both mar continued in the conntry towards fals to their court. Marlhal Brog. the Weser, to observe the motions lio alledged, that his misfortune of marshal Broglio. was owing to the prince de Sou Whilit thele various positions bise's delay, who did not begin the were mutually taken, as the armies attack till it was too late for him to were continually moving near each continue it ; the prince de Sou- other, a number of very sharp skirbise, on the other hand, fuggested, mishes ensued. Marshal Broglio that Broglio began his attack ear- cautiously avoided a battle whenlier than the time that had been ever he saw that the duke of Brunffixed, in hopes of forcing the allies wick, by calling together his troops, without Soubise's affistance; and had prepared for, and was dewhen he found that point loft, ob- firous of it ; so that there was liged Soubife to retreat, that he might way left, but, if possible, to check not have the honour of recovering it. his motions, and wear down his

The allies after this battle kept force by reiterated lefser actions. their ground for some time, whilft These actions were almost always the French retreated. It is impof- to the advantage of our troops. In sible regularly to account for all one of them however, the young the unexpected turns which have prince Henry of Brunswick was happened, perhaps, more in this mortally wounded ; and campaign, than in any of the for- the whole army saw with

July 2oth. It is enongh to know that regret, the disappointment of such

great

no

mer.

great hopes as were formed from nor direct opposition, became his the rising gallantry of a prince, who object. He resolved, that as often fo nobly supported the martial spirit as he perceived marshal Broglio's of his family, and had fallen whilft making any progress on the fu peche was emulating the heroic actions ted quarter, he should throw himof his brother the hereditary prince self as far into Heffe, as the ene. and his uncle Ferdinand.

my had advanced towards HanOn the side of Westphalia, the over, and by stopping their subprince de Soubile persevered, not- fitence, oblige them to quit their withstanding some checks, in his enterprize. This plan at first fucdesign of laying fiege to Munfer ; ceeded to his wishes, and drew there was great reason to apprehend back marshal Broglio into Hesse, that he might succeed in that enter- upon whose approach prince Ferdiprize, as it was always in marshal nand retired to his old quarters at Proglio's power, by taking some Paderborn, and was ready steps on the side of Hanover, to for a new movement as

i9th Oet. make it necessary to draw away the soon as Broglio should return to the greatest part of the force destined execution of his former design. to the succour of Munster,

He

Accordingly he foon returned to therefore began to make the pre- the Weler. Then the hereditary vious arrangements at Dorsten. prince, who had by this time reThe hereditary prince, who knew joined the grand army, advanced that he was continually liable to be into Hesse, and pushed to the farcalied off, took the first opportunity theit extremities of that country, Aug. 30th.

of attacking this place. even as far as Fitzlar ; but though

A battalion of French he succeeded fo far in his attempts troops formed its garrison, and as to destroy all the lesser maga. made a brave defence, but it was zines which he found in the open affaulted with so much resolution country; yet as all the fortresses and perseverance, that they were were in the hands of the enemy, obliged to surrender prisoners of as the garisons had been newly rewar. The prince totally deltroyed inforced, and the grand magazines the ovens which were established were well secured in those places, here, and by this means not only he kept his ground in his advanced frustrated their design of besieging position. Munfter, but compelled them for a It was on this occasion principally time, to retire from the Lippe. that princé Ferdinand found the

As to prince Ferdinard, he saw disadvantage of not being able to clearly, that the intentions of mar form two armies, which might act fal Broglio were to make himself separately. For on one hand, marmaster of his majesty's, and the snal Broglio, when he had perfectly duke of Brunswick's territories. To secured his posts in Hesse, took a attempt to follow him, and to beat situation in which he watched all him from thence, would only be the motions of prince Ferdinand, irrecoverably to transfer the seat of and kept himself in readiness to war into those countries, and whole fall back into Heffe, or to advance ly to abandon Westphalia to the into Hanover, as might beft agree enemy, Diversion therefore, and with his designs. From hence he

fent

VI.

tion. Motions of the Ruffians and leben removed. Colberg befirged. War transferred to Pomerania.

Schweidnitz taken by a coup de il Knoblock made prisoner at Trepolberg taken. Rujians winter in

fent out some powerful detachments Tasmin'
which ažed with great ef4. Ose grels ciclismo
of chele decachments entered the of die 18,
Harts Paret (the remains of the degree
great iiria, hace among was
the ancieais! ad belayed the power, die
strong caltie of Schartsieks

, sbich pries 3 ***
they took and demolibed. Then Thea.es
they laid the whole trađi of country or :
under severe corbution. Ano- cum
ther, and fill more powerful de aroon
tachment under priace Xavier of wohin beton
Saxony appeared before Wollen und
buttel, a confiderable city, and with its
strongly fituzved

, 23 it is non, and
Ocker. But the French, as they WC
knew that the town is molisy buit: pm

[ocr errors]

of wood, commenced their ope cannot tations with a very herce bombard. Ies, shara ment. This had iuch an eiicit

, like to se mi that the reñidance of the place was prace o B.. not proportioned to is freagth; in questo five days it surrendered

, and was capavie ci co do subjed, like the rekt, to a grievous his 22mj vy cium:

contribution,

3

Welighelia

, a
Flushed with this faccels, the most creed mor. Toto
French fallowed their blow, and Osnabrag; and
advanced, keeping fill the course butions were no es
of the Ocker, to Bruniwick; and they gave up on
began also to need to city

. The lazed by iku 43,
reigning prince, unable to proteẬ the milerande in
his subjects, or to secure bis person merci de o
in his dominions

, fled to Hamburg, fx as Embden. The
where he met the landgrave of town was immediately be the
Hesse, whom the rage of war had by the gariga iwi Eizko
in the same manner driven from his panies of interesa
territories. This free city now be the timid inima, 20
came a place of general refuge, and mile of farowak uchun
enriched itself by the cela.ties

, as wichtanding is capital
it had in beter times done by the the merit of io ta'y a íone del
prosperity of Germany. It was toxa, as weil as the whol bo materia
Lately computed

, that the Prangers of Eat Frieland, was land
there had increased to forty thou, a ruinous contribuis. Bernd
fand amongt wham they could exorbiances giex en af €1
reckon two sovereign princes

, and tremiy, tai the boss kate 2:
feveral other persons of th: het die lentä сompeid te fs, 23
tination.

even of these battles, the king

his generals were defeated. e was victorious only in eight. en of them were fought under s own command; and seven out

the eight victories which were ined, were obtained by himf in person; of the eleven de. its, he was present only at ree. From these circumstances some igment may be formed of the ace and enterprizing character of is monarch, and of the amazing ources he had prepared, or form

or seized, and in some instances, e may fay, almost created. We ve obierved that the laitcampaign d ended more to his advantage, in the one preceeding had done;

those two great victories of Lig. z, and Torgau, with which he en ended his operations, had not ly rescued his affairs on Silesia and xony from impending destruction

had enlarged his field for reaiting, and prepared him, to all pearance, for more early and virous action, than could have been pected in most of the preceeding mpaigns. But every one was prized to observe, that this year had totally altered the system of i conduct. Au inactivity and gour was diffused over all his ceedings. He seemed to have pred the caution and slowness ich has been a long opposed to

his

great hopes as were formed from not direct opposition, became his the rising gallantry of a prince, who object. He resolved, that as often fo nobly supported the martial spirit as he perceived marshal Broglio's of his family, and had fallen whilft making any progress on the suspeche was emulating the heroic actions ted quarter, he should throw himof his brother the hereditary prince self as far into Hesse, as the eneand his uncle Ferdinand.

my had advanced towards HanOn the side of Westphalia, the over, and by stopping their subprince de Soubise persevered, not- fiítence, oblige them to quit their withstanding some checks, in his enterprize. This plan at first fucdesign of laying fiege to Munfler ; ceeded to his wishes, and drew there was great reason to apprehend back marshal Broglio into Heise, that he might succeed in that enter upon whose approach prince Ferdiprize, as it was always in marshal nand retired to his old quarters at Broglio's power, by taking some Paderborn, and was ready steps on the side of Hanover, to for a new movement as

19th Oa. make it necessary to draw away the soon as Broglio should return to the greatest part of the force destined execution of bis former design. to the succour of Munfter. He Accordingly he foon returned to therefore began to make the pre- the Wefer. Then the hereditary vious arrangements at Dorsten. prince, who had by this time reThe hereditary prince, who knew joined the grand army, advanced that he was continually liable to be into Heffe, and pushed to the farcalled off, took the first opportunity thett extremities of that country,

of attacking this place. even as far as Fitzlar ; but though Aug. 30th.

A battalion of French he succeeded fo far in his attempts troops formed its garrison, and as to destroy all the lesser maga. made a brave defence, but it was zines which he found in the open affaulted with so much resolution country; yet as all the fortresses and perseverance, that they were were in the hands of the enemy, obliged to surrender prisoners of as the garisons had been newly rewar. The prince totally destroyed inforced, and the grand magazines the ovens which were established were well secured in those places, here, and by this means not only he kept his ground in his advanced frustrated their design of besieging position. Munfter, but compelled them for a It was on this occasion principally time, to retire from the Lippe. that princé Ferdinand found the

As to prince Ferdinard, he saw disadvantage of not being able to clearly, that the intentions of mar form two armies, which might act fhal Broglio were to make himself separately. For on one hand, marmafter of his majesty's, and the fal Broglio, when he had perfectly duke of Brunswick's territories. To secured his posts in Hesse, took a attempt to follow him, and to beat situation in which he watched all him from thence, would only be the motions of prince Ferdinand, irrecoverably to transfer the seat of and kept himself in readiness to war into those countries, and whole fall back into Hesse, or to advance ly to abandon Weftphalia to the into Hanover, as might best agree enemy. Diversion therefore, and with his designs. From hence he

fent

« 前へ次へ »