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numerous, and must be singularly grotesque. Eight hundred and thirty-four still remain out of more than a thousand! They are ten feet high, eighteen inches in diameter, made of jaspar, porphyry, verd-antique, and the choicest marbles-grey, red, green, blue, yellow, and white. In some rooms the walls are covered with exquisite tracery, interspersed with Arabic inscriptions. But the chapel of Mahomed, against the southern wall, surpasses in beauty every other part of the mosque ; with its three enclosures, separated by columns of jasper, supporting arches in double tiers, of the most grotesque forms. In the wall is a horse-shoe archway, leading into an inner room, and round it a deep facing of arabesques of the most elegant patterns and brilliant colours-red, black, and gold-formed by mosaic work of chrystal, of inimitable beanty. The Christian additions to the building cannot be viewed without indignation. Nothing besides the mosque remains to indicate the splendour of which Cordoba boasted under the Khalifs. In the tenth century it attained its highest pitch of greatness. The useful arts, especially agriculture, were carried to perfection ; inventions were patronized; numerous colleges were established. One library contained 600,000 volumes, and this before the invention of printing! Then its commercial prosperity was at its height. The revenue of the kingdom exceeded six millions sterling, an enormous sum for that early age. The city was of vast extent; one Moorish writer relates, that he travelled ten miles through an uninterrupted line of buildings : exclusive of the suburbs, the city was fourteen miles in circumference; the houses of the whole were more than 200,000, the mosques 600, the hospitals fifty, public schools eighty, public baths 900, and the population to nearly a million, (see Conde, Los Arebes en España, and Casiri, Biblioteca Arabico-Hispana Escurialensis.) Now the population is under thirty thousand, commerce and manufactures utterly dead, and only a decaying wreck remains. Cordoba never recovered the disruption of the ancient kingdom, or the expulsion of the Moors in 1236. Every thing betokens absolute decay—all is dull and drooping but nature-its Spanish manners however are unalloyed, and no city can boast of more romantic associations, while none has preserved so many remains of the olden time.

Farewell to Cordoba ; now for Grenada, a distance of twenty-two leagues, or more than eighty miles. We must skip the muleroute through Baena to Grenada, although it is most interesting and romantic, (especially the description of the sun-rise approach to that city,) with a line from Childe Harold, which points to all;

• How carols now the lusty muleteer ?
Of love, romance, devotion is his lay,

As whilome he was wont the leagues to cheer,
His quick bells wildly jingling on the way.'

In the morning, after three nights of travel over the dusty roads of this sun-burnt country, our author found himself at the Fonda de Commercio, the principal inn in Grenada. We feel it to be utterly impossible in our limited space to do justice to the glories of Grenada, upon which the author rings no less than nine chapters. Mateo Ximines, whom Geoffrey Crayon has celebrated, came and offered his services, which were of course accepted. We have first a chapter on the city, then a chapter on the city and the Alhambra, then a chapter on the palace, then another on the Alhambra again, then one on the Generaliffe, then separate chapters on the Albaycin, the Alamedas, and after a magnificent excursion to the Sierra Nevada, a wind-up chapter on the city again. With all these things the public are tolerably familiar; and we can only refer to them as by far the cleverest portions of the work. We had marked a score of passages for quotation.

From Grenada to Malaga, by Velez ; Malaga to Rondo, Gibraltar, and back to Cadiz, we cannot accompany our traveller. In following him throughout we have sadly felt the want of a map of the province. Instead of these paltry sketches, let us have, in common courtesy, a decent map in the next edition.

The concluding chapter contains a summary of the Andalucian character, which would appear to be a veritable compound of the satyr and tiger. Liberty has sprung up here, after ages of tyranny; but destruction not reconstruction, seems her present work throughout Spain; and until this preliminary business be accomplished we shall look in vain for the development of its vast internal resources.

The prospect, however, is not so cheerless as the retrospect; but

• What are monuments of bravery

Where no public virtues bloom ?
What avails in lands of slavery

Trophied temples, arch, and tomb ?
Pageants ! Let the world revere us,

For our people's rights and laws !' We cannot conclude this brief and imperfect notice, without again congratulating the author on his performance, and once more commending the work to the attention of our readers.

numerous, and must be singularly grotesque. Eight hundred and thirty-four still remain out of more than a thousand! They are ten feet high, eighteen inches in diameter, made of jaspar, porphyry, verd-antique, and the choicest marbles-grey, red, green, blue, yellow, and white. In some rooms the walls are covered with exquisite tracery, interspersed with Arabic inscriptions. But the chapel of Mahomed, against the southern wall, surpasses in beauty every other part of the mosque ; with its three enclosures, separated by columns of jasper, supporting arches in double tiers, of the most grotesque forms. In the wall is a horse-shoe archway, leading into an inner room, and round it a deep facing of arabesques of the most elegant patterns and brilliant colours-red, black, and gold-formed by mosaic work of chrystal, of inimitable beauty. The Christian additions to the building cannot be viewed without indignation. Nothing besides the mosque remains to indicate the splendour of which Cordoba boasted under the Khalifs. In the tenth century it attained its highest pitch of greatness. The useful arts, especially agriculture, were carried to perfection ; inventions were patronized; numerous colleges were established. One library contained 600,000 volumes, and this before the invention of printing! Then its commercial prosperity was at its height. The revenue of the kingdom exceeded six millions sterling, an enormous sum for that early age. The city was of vast extent; one Moorish writer relates, that he travelled ten miles through an uninterrupted line of buildings : exclusive of the suburbs, the city was fourteen miles in circumference; the houses of the whole were more than 200,000, the mosques 600, the hospitals fifty, public schools eighty, public baths 900, and the population to nearly a million, (see Conde, Los Arebes en España, and Casiri, Biblioteca Arabico-Hispana Escurialensis.) Now the population is under thirty thousand, commerce and manufactures utterly dead, and only a decaying wreck remains. Cordoba never recovered the disruption of the ancient kingdom, or the expulsion of the Moors in 1236. Every thing betokens absolute decay-all is dull and drooping but nature-its Spanish manners however are unalloyed, and no city can boast of more romantic associations, while none has preserved so many remains of the olden time.

Farewell to Cordoba ; now for Grenada, a distance of twenty-two leagues, or more than eighty miles. We must skip the mule route through Baena to Grenada, although it is most interesting and romantic, (especially the description of the sun-rise approach to that city,) with a line from Childe Harold, which points to all ;

• How carols now the lusty muleteer?
Of love, romance, devotion is his lay,

As whilome he was wont the leagues to cheer,
His quick bells wildly jingling on the way.'

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In the morning, after three nights of travel over the dusty roads of this sun-burnt country, our author found himself at the Fonda de Commercio, the principal inn in Grenada. We feel it to be utterly impossible in our limited space to do justice to the glories of Grenada, upon which the author rings no less than nine chapters. Mateo Ximines, whom Geoffrey Crayon has celebrated, came and offered his services, which were of course accepted. We have first a chapter on the city, then a chapter on the city and the Alhambra, then a chapter on the palace, then another on the Alhambra again, then one on the Generaliffe, then separate chapters on the Albaycin, the Alamedas, and after a magnificent excursion to the Sierra Nevada, a wind-up chapter on the city again. With all these things the public are tolerably familiar; and we can only refer to them as by far the cleverest portions of the work. We had marked a score of passages for quotation.

From Grenada to Malaga, by Velez ; Malaga to Rondo, Gibraltar, and back to Cadiz, we cannot accompany our traveller. In following him throughout we have sadly felt the want of a map of the province. Instead of these paltry sketches, let us have, in common courtesy, a decent map in the next edition.

The concluding chapter contains a summary of the Andalucian character, which would appear to be a veritable compound of the satyr and tiger. Liberty has sprung up here, after ages of tyranny; but destruction not reconstruction, seems her present work throughout Spain ; and until this preliminary business be accomplished we shall look in vain for the development of its vast internal resources.

The prospect, however, is not so cheerless as the retrospect; but

· What are monuments of bravery

Where no public virtues bloom ?
What avails in lands of slavery

Trophied temples, arch, and tomb ?
Pageants ! Let the world revere us,

For our people's rights and laws l'
We cannot conclude this brief and imperfect notice, without
again congratulating the author on his performance, and once
more commending the work to the attention of our readers.

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Art. VII. 1. The Drawing Room Scrap-Book. MDCCCXL. With

Poetical Illustrations. By L. E. L. and Mary Howitt. London

Fisher, Son, and Co. 2. The Juvenile Scrap-Book. By Mrs. Ellis. MDCCCXL. Lon

don : Fisher, Son, and Co.

THE 'HE general character of the former of these elegant volumes is

well known to our readers, and we may therefore spare ourselves the labor of sketching it. As a collection of beautiful, and for the most part highly-finished engravings, illustrated by appropriate poetry and prose, it has long been a favorite with the public, and has consequently held on in its course while many of its rivals have passed into oblivion. The present volume, which constitutes we believe the tenth, brings with it some melancholy associations, arising from the premature and tragical death of the accomplished lady whose peculiar sentiments and graceful poetry have contributed so largely to the past popularity of the work. We little thought when announcing last year, the departure of L. E. L. from England, that the volume for 1840 would contain a touching allusion to her melancholy death, and a warm-hearted though brief tribute to her genius. But so it is, and were we to give utterance to the feelings which are uppermost in our hearts, we should moralize on the delusive aspect of surrounding things, and the folly of permitting our confidence to rest on any thing below the skies. Neither youth, nor beauty, the force of genius, nor the bright visions of a poet's eye, can avert the fate which impends alike o'er all. At a moment when we think not, the summons comes, and to obey—and only to obey-is ours. We must not, however, be diverted from our proper object, and hasten, therefore, to notice the volume itself. The Messrs. Fishers have done wisely in engaging Mrs. Howitt as the successor of L. E. L. They could not have made a more becoming selection, or one in better keeping with the nature of their work. Those who are acquainted with the productions of this lady will need no evidence of the correctness of our statement, and others will be of the same mind with ourselves on closing this volume. • I feel,' remarks Mrs. Howitt, “that a responsible and somewhat

difficult duty has been laid upon me, less from the intrinsic na'ture of the work itself, than from being the successor of the former

editor. The pleasant custom of nine years had so associated her • name, and her peculiar sentiments and graceful poetry, with

these volumes, that, even though it had been possible for me to perform the task more ably, it must take some time to accustom the public to the difference.'

Miss Landon, it appears, had prepared eight poems for the present volume, which, says her successor, ‘for noble sentiment,

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