ページの画像
PDF
ePub

316; importance of discharging all
civil duties, 317; necessity of Dis-
senters being political, 318 ; civil
duties not to be left to the irreligious,
319; presence of Christians in popular
assemblies has prevented much evil,
320; duty of Christians to act well
the citizen, 321 ; necessity for the
cultivation of piety, 322; bappy re-
sults from the performance of Chris-
tian duty, 323; necessity for its full
discharge, 324.
Clarke, C., John Noakes and Mary

Styles, see English Dialects.
Cobbin, J., Choral Psalmody for the

Church and the Family, 733.
Cobbin, Rev. I., Condensed Commen-

tary, and Family Exposition of the

Holy Bible, 480.
Comparative Philology, 209; import-

ance of the study, ib.; character and
analysis of Mr. Donaldson's work,
210, et seq.; character of Mr. Win-
ning's book, 211 ; view of the article
on Language in Penny Cyclopedia,
212; publication on the study of Com-

parative Grammar, 214.
Congregational Magazine, May, 1839,

see Are we Protestants ?
Congregational Union, minutes of the

pinth annual assembly of, 481.
Cramp. J. M., Text Book of Popery,

see Catholic Controversy.
Dick, A. C. Esq., Dissertation on

Church Polity, 545 ; division of the
advocates of state churches, ib.; cha.
racter of their labors, 546; character
and analysis of the work, ib. et seq.;
absurdity of the argument from the
Jewish dispensation, 547; unsatisfac-
tory statement of the argument by
Mr. Gladstone, 548; common sophism
used by Churchmen refuted, 549; ex.
pediency only urged by Churchmen,
ib. ; influence of establishments on
morals and creeds, 550 ; education,
552 ; activity of Christians, ib. ; po-
litical institutions, 553; expectations

of Dissenters, ib.
Donaldson, J. W., see Comparative

Philology.
Douglas, James, Esq., on the Philosophy

of the Mind, 49; decline of meta-
physical studies, ib.; evil results of
such declension, ib.; happy effects of
the study of mental philosophy, 50 ;
disciplines the mind, 51; revival of
the study, 52 ; character of the work
and its author, ib. ; remarks on the
Emotions, 53 ; analysis of the volume,
54, et seq.; Socrates, ib.; Perception,
extract, 57; hostility of Reid to the
ideal system, 58; errors of the nomi.
nalists, 59; the constructive faculty,

60; reasoning and logic, ib.; direct
benefits of logic, ib.; origin of its
fallacy, 62; freedom and the will, 63;
the author's mistaken view of Ed.
wards, 65 ; deficiencies of natural re-
ligion, 67 ; character of the work,

68.
Douglas, James, Esq., The Revival of

Religion, 118.
Drawing-room Scrap Book, by L. E. L.

and Mary Howitt, 572 ; L'Envoi,
573; Kate is crazed, ib.; Thomas Clark.
son, 574; a city street, 575; character
of the Drawing-room Scrap Book,

and of the Juvenile Scrap Book, 576.
Dunn, H., Principles of Teaching, 237.
Edgar, s., Variations of Popery, see

Cathohc Controversy.
Editor, correspondence with the, 482.
Educator, The, 683; contents and wri.

ters of the work, ib. ; position occu-
pied by the conductors of secular
education, ib.; eminent men who have
filled the office, 684 ; importance of
elevating the profession in public es.
teem, ib.; Mr. Lalor on the present
position of school-masters, 685 ; sugges-
tion of Mr. Higginson as to the remedy,
686 ; prospect of their elevation, 687 ;
character of Mr. Higginson's essay,
688 ; his suggestions as to the elevation
of educators, ib.; Mr. Simpson's essay,
689; his assertion of the claims of edu-

cators to emolument, ib.
Eisdell, J. S., Treatise on the Industry

of Nations, 346; Burke's fallacy in
reference to political economists, ib.;
valuable character of Mr. Eisdell's
work, 347; analysis, ib. et seq.; manu-
facture of cloth, 348 ; printing rollers
and other inventions, 349; currency in
England, 351 ; metallic money unde-
cessary, ib. ; issue of paper money,
352; division of property, 353 ; popu-
lation, extract, ib.; distribution, 354 ;
rent, extract, 355; corn-laws, 356; pro-
fits of stock, 357 ; wages, ib.; consump-
tion, 358; results of luxury, 359; accu.
mulation, 360; taxation, ib. ; costs of
protection, 361 ; improved mode of
taxation, 362; education and public
worship, ib.; poor. laws, 363; results
of a tax on capital, ib.; commendation

of the work, 364.
Eliot, Sir John, see Forster, John.
Ellis, Mrs., Juvenile Scrap Book, see

Drawing-room Scrap Book.
Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of

Great Britain, 187; progress and cha-
racter of Lardner's Cyclopedia, ib.;
character of the work under review,
188; literary biography, ib.; improper
treatment of Alfred, 189; want of
judgment in the writers, 191 ; singu.

521 ; translations by Berners and
Johnes, ibi; battle of Crecy, 522 ; bat.
tle of Otterbourne, 526 ; tournament of
Inglevere, 531 ; present edition of the

work warmly commended, 538.
Fry, Alfred A., Report of the Case of

the Canadian Prisoners, see Habeas

Corpus.

lar view of Shakespear, 192 ; Shake-
spear's improvement of an old play, 194 ;
mode in which plays were acted in the
early part of the seventeenth century,
204 ; miracle plays, ertract, 206 ; pi.
rate song, 207 ; Anecdotes of Skelton,
208 ; character of Bell's Lives of the

British Poets, 209.
Encyclopedia Britannica, Part CVIII.,

117; see Registration.
English Dialects, 690; advantages of

works of dialects, and of glossaries,
ib.; specimen from Exmoor, 691 ; Ap.
pleby school-boy's speech, ib. ; former
works on the subject, ib.; character of

the books now published, ib.
Englishman's Greek Concordance to the

New Testament, see Robson.
Exmoor Scolding and Courtship, see

English Dialects.
Festus, a Poem, 654 ; story of the poem,

656 ; character of the poetry, 657 ;
description of Angela, ib. ; Clara, 659;
Lucifer preaching, 660 ; Village feasts,
ib.; Audress of Festus, 661 ; promising

character of the author, 663.
First Annual Report of the Registrar-

General of Births, Deaths, and Mar-
riages in England, see Registration.
Floreston, or the New Lord of the

Manor, 455 ; sketch of the story,
illustrative of England as it should

be, ib.; the work commended, 457.
Forster, John, Lives of Eminent British

Statesmen, 365; British worthies of
the seventeenth century, ib.; sketch
of Sir John Eliot's history, 366, et
seq. ; his education and entrance into
public life, 1367 ; character of the
Stuarts, ib.; Elizabeth, ib.; character
of James, 368; state of Europe, 370;
Eliot's introduction to the House of
Commons, 371 ; his intrepidity, ib. ;
bis religious character, 372 ; bis po-
litical conduct, 373 ; death of James,
374 ; character of Charles, 375; con-
duct of the Commons, ib.; evil of pur-
veyance, 376; Elioe's popularity, 377;
bis parliamentary eloquence, extract,
ib.; committed to the tower, 380 ;
treachery of the king, 385; state of
the country, ib. ; Eliot's' last speech,
386; his principles and character,
388 ; his portrait taken, and his death,

391.
Froissart, Sir John, Chronicles of Eng-

land, France, Spain, &c., Johnes's
translation, 515 ; imagiuative element
in ruder bistory accounted for, 516 ;
resemblance between Herodotus and
Froissart, 517; both distinguished for
honesty and diligence, 518 ; character
of Froissart, 519; an incessant tra-
veller, ib.; reception of bis Chronicles,

Geography of the Bible, 607.
Gilbert, Mrs., The Convalescent, 607.
Gisborne, T. Esq., see Session, review

of the.
Gregg, T. 1., and Macguire, T., Dis-

cussion between, see Catholic Con.

versy.
Gutzlaff, C., Journal of Three Voyages

along the coast of China, 118.
Habeas Corpus, 325; case of the Cana-

dian prisoners not generally under-
stood, ib. ; origin of the Habeas Cor.
pus writ, 327 ; its neglect and viola-
tion by Charles I., 328 ; conduct of
Jenkes, extract, 329; main object of
the act, 330; its unsatisfactory state,
331; use of the act in the case of the
Canadian prisoners, extract, ib.; im-

portance of the subject, 334.
Hack, Maria, English Stories of the

Olden Time, 118.
Hall, Rev. R., Christianity consistent

with the Love of Freedom, see Chris-
tians, the Political Duty of.
Hanbury, Benjamin, Historical Memo-

rials relating to the Congregationalists,
335; character of the volume, ib. ;
plan, 337 ; analysis, 340, et seq. ;
rise of the Independents, 342; power
of the people, 343 : views of Hall and
others, ib.; extracts from Barrow, 344;
history of the Independents, ib.; read-
ers for whom adapted, 345 ; the iin-
pression it should produce, 346.
Hanmer, Sir J., Fra Cipella, and other

Poems, 238.
Holland, Dr. H., Medical Notes and

Reflections, 733.
Howitt, Mary, see Drawing-room Scrap

Book.
Huntingdon, Life and Times of the

Countess of, 609; interest and value
of the work, ib.; peculiarities of her
times, 610 ; sketch of her biography,
ib. et seq.; birth, 611 ; introduction of
evangelical religion into her family,
ib.; Lady Margaret Hastings, 612; con-
version of Lady Huntingdon, ib.; con-
duct of her husband, ertract, 613; her
attendance on the Methodists, 614 ;
Letters from the Duchess of Marlbo.
rough, ib.; rise and progress of Me.
thodism, 615, et seq. ; John Nelson,
eatract, 618; violence of the Welsh
magistrates, 621 ; Whitefield and his
preaching, extract, 623 ; infidelity of

Bolingbroke, ib.; Countess of Suffolk,
624 ; state of the Dissenters, 625 ;
conduct of the evangelical clergy,
626 ; character of Methodism, 627 ;
Rev. H. Venn, extract, ib.; want of
eandor in his biographer, 628 ; Sou-
they's allusion to Berridge, extract,
629; Whitefield and Wesley, 630;
separation of the Methodists, 631;
character of the controversy, 632 ; death
of Lady H., 633; character of the

work, 634 ; duty of the church, ib.
Indian Papers ; correspondence relating

to Aden, see Turkey, prospects of.
Innes's Political Economy of the New

Testament, 238.
Intelligence, Literary, 119, 239, 483,

608, 734.
Inquirer, the, October, 1839, 734.
Irving, Dr. D. Lives of Scottish Writers,

237.
James, J. A., The Young Man from

Home, 607.
Jethro: a System of Lay Agency; see

Lay Agency.
La Trobe, Rev. J. A., Scripture Illustra.

tions, 607.
Lay Agency, 665; inadequacy of the

ministry to the full diffusion of
the gospel, ib.; Works on the sub-
ject, 666 ; Dr. Matheson on prejudices
against lay agency, ib.; unscriptural
distinction between clergy and laity,
667 ; Jethro, 668 ; governing principle,
669; District Divisions, ib.; department
relating to the congregation, 674 ; popil-
lation in the vicinage, 676 ; excellencies
of the plan, 678 ; its faults, 679 ;
every thing to be done by the churches,
ib.; "authority vested in the pastor,
680 ; preference to Dr. Matheson's

Essay, 681 ; Loan Tract System, ib.
Lepage's French Master for the Nursery,

and French School, parts 1 and 2,606.
London Exbibitions, 281 ; public taste

for sight-seeing subject for congratula-
tion, ib.; present attractions of Lon.
don, 283 ; Zoological Gardens, 28+;
Adelaide Gallery, 285; Polytechnic
Institution, 286 ; Tower, 287 ; Dio-
rama, 290 ; British Museum, 293;
British Institution, ib.; Colosseum,
295 ; Royal Academy, ib.; Sur-
rey Zoological Gardens, ib.; Green-
wich Park, 296 ; Woolwich Dockyard,
ib.; Hampton Court, ib.; Kew Gar-
dens, ib.; Westminster Abbey, 297 ;
spirit of extortion, ib.; importance of
free admission, 298 ; improper beha-
viour at exhibitions, 299 ; increase of
visitors at the British Museum, 301 ;
improvement of the people at News
castle, extract, ib.; cautions to visitors,
302 ; increase of a spirit of mutual

accommodation, 303 ; statistics of the
British Museum, 304 ; Armouries at the
Tower, ib.; Zoological Gardens, ib.;
Zoological Museum, 305; National
Gallery, ib.; gratification of curiosity

improving to the mind, ib.
Lyndhurst, lord, Speech of, see Session,

review of the.
Maclure, Dr. R., Praxis on the Latin

Potential and Subjunctive Moods, 605.
Marryat, Captain, Diary in America,

with Remarks on its Institutions, 422;
importance of collecting facts relating
to America, ib.; the author's object in
visiting the United States, 423 ; bis
self-complacency and bad taste, 424 ;
arrival at New York, 425 ; humouronis
anecdotes, ib.; Radicalism and Demo-
cracy, ib.; rise and present state of Buf-
fulo, 427 ; Mr. Rathbun, ib.; Canadian
provinces, 428 ; escitability of the Ame-
ricans, 430; interview with an editor of
a newspaper, ib.; American Museums,
432 ; the American Congress, 433;
prying disposition of the Americans,
434; character of the work, 436; mis-
taken view of the author on slavery,
ib.; rapid progress of anti-slavery
principles, ib.; his errors on the vo-
luntary system, 437; defects of the

book, 438.
Matheson, Dr. J., Our Country; see Lay

Agency.
Miller, Thomas, Rural Sketches, 69;

acceptable character of the work to
those leaving, town, ib.; absurd con-
duct of the fashionable world, 70 ; the
author's qualifications for describing
scenes connected with the working
classes, 71; their future influence on
literature, 72; present perverted
state of the press, ib.; character of the
book and its author, 73; Home reri-
sited, 74 ; arrangements for a marriage,
77 ; contrast between the poor in London
and the country, 79; the work warmly

commended, 81.
Milman, Rev. H. H., Life of Edward

Gibbon, Esq., 142; character of Gib-
bon, ib.; sketch of his biography, ib. et
seq.; birth and education, 143, cha..
racter of his aunt, ib.; their removal to
Westminster, 144 ; his intense read-
ing, 145 ; Magdulen College, ib.; prob.
able cause of his infidelity, 147; his
profession of Popery, 148 ; removal
to Switzerland, 149; his grateful regard
of M. Pavilliard, 149; study of the
classics, 150; revisits England, 15.
origin of his history, 152 ; Pors
opinion of it, 153; the receptie
his history, 154; sketch of his
ib.; its completion and publice
extract, 156 ; again retires to Swi

lar view of Shakespear, 192 ; Shake-
spear's improvement of an old play, 194 ;
mode in which plays were acted in the
early part of the seventeenth century,
204 ; miracle plays, ertract, 206 ; pi.
rate song, 207; Anecdotes of Skelton,
208; character of Bell's Lives of the

British Poets, 209.
Encyclopedia Britannica, Part CVIII.,

117; see Registration.
English Dialects, 690 ; advantages of

works of dialects, and of glossaries,
ib. ; specimen from Exmoor, 691 ; Ap.
pleby school-boy's speech, ib. ; former
works on the subject, ib.; character of

the books now published, ib.
Englishman's Greek Concordance to the

New Testament, see Robson.
Exmoor Scolding and Courtship, see

English Dialects.
Festus, a Poem, 654; story of the poem,

656; character of the poetry, 657 ;
description of Angela, ib. ; Clara, 659;
Lucifer preaching, 660; Village feasts,
ib.; Address of Festus, 661 ; promising

character of the author, 663.
First Annual Report of the Registrar-

General of Births, Deaths, and Mar-
riages in England, see Registration.
Floreston, or the New Lord of the

Manor, 455 ; sketch of the story,
illustrative of England as it should

be, ib.; the work commended, 457.
Forster, John, Lives of Eminent British

Statesmen, 365; British worthies of
the seventeenth century, ih. ; sketch
of Sir John Eliot's history, 366, et
seq. ; his education and entrance into
public life, 1367 ; cbaracter of the
Stuarts, ib.; Elizabeth, ib.; character
of James, 368; state of Europe, 370;
Eliot's introduction to the House of
Commons, 371 ; his intrepidity, ib.;
his religious character, 372 ; his po-
litical conduct, 373 ; death of James,
374; character of Charles, 375; con-
duct of the Commons, ib.; evil of pur-
veyance, 376; Eliot's popularity, 377;
bis parliamentary eloquence, extract,
ib.; committed to the tower, 380;
treachery of the king, 385; state of
the country, ib. ; Eline's last speech,
386 ; his princi character,
388 ; his portrai

* his death,
391.
Froissart, Sir Johi
land, France,

Johnes's
translation, 516

ve element
in ruder bistor
resemblance be
Froissart, 517;
honesty and dil
of Froissart, 5
veller, ib., reces

521 ; translations by Berners and
Johnes, ibi; battle of Crecy, 522; bat.
tle of Otterbourne, 526 ; tournament of
Inglevere, 531 ; present edition of the

work warmly commended, 538.
Fry, Alfred A., Report of the Case of

the Canadian Prisoners, see Habeas

Corpus.
Geography of the Bible, 607.
Gilbert, Mrs., The Convalescent, 607.
Gisborne, T. Esq., see Session, review

of the.
Gregg, T. D., and Macguire, T., Dis.

cussion between, see Catholic Con-

versy.
Gutzlaff, C., Journal of Three Voyages

along the coast of China, 118.
Habeas Corpus, 325; case of the Cana-

dian prisoners not generally under-
stood, ib.; origin of the Habeas Cor.
pus writ, 327 ; its neglect and viola-
tion by Charles I., 328; conduct of
Jenkes, extract, 329; main object of
the act, 330; its unsatisfactory state,
331 ; use of the act in the case of the
Canadian prisoners, extract, ib. ; im-

portance of the subject, 334.
Hack, Maria, English Stories of the

Olden Time, 118.
Hall, Rev. R., Christianity consistent

with the Love of Freedom, see Chris-

tians, the Political Duty of.
Hanbury, Benjamin, Historical Memo-

rials relating to the Congregationalists,
335; character of the volume, ib.;
plan, 387; analysis, 340, et seq. ;
rise of the Independents, 342; power
of the people, 343 : views of Hall and
others, ib.; extracts from Barrow, 344;
history of the Independents, ib.; read-
ers for whom adapted, 345; the inn-
pression it should produce, 346.
Hanmer, Sir J., Fra Cipella, and other

Poems, 238.
Holland, Dr. H., Medical Notes and

Reflections, 733.
Howitt, Mary, ning-room Scrap

Book.
Huntingdon,

imes of the
Countess

est and value
of the wc

arities of her
times, 61

her biography,

introduction of
evange

nto her family,

astings, 612; con-
versior

itingdon, ib., con-
duct

ertract, 613; her
Methodists, 614;
Duchess of Marlbo.

d progress of Me
th

seq. ; John Nelson,
lence of the Welsh

Whitefield and his
1, 625; infidelity of

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

+

629;

432 ;

Bolingbroke, ib.; Countess of Suffolk,
624 ; state of the Dissenters, 625;
conduct of the evangelical clergy,
626 ; character of Methodism, 627 ;
Rev. H. Venn, extract, ib.; want of
candor in his biographer, 628 ; Sou-
they's allusion to Berridge, extract,

Whitefield and Wesley, 630 ;
separation of the Methodists, 631
character of the controversy, 632 ; death
of Lady H., 633; character of the

work, 634 ; duty of the church, ib.
Indian Papers ; correspondence relating
to Aden,

see Turkey, prospects of.
Indes's Political Economy of the New

Testament, 238.
Intelligence, Literary, 119, 239, 483,

608, 734.
Inquirer, the, October, 1839, 734.
Irving, Dr. D. Lives of Scottish Writers,

237.
James, J. A., The Young Man from

Home, 607.
Jethro : a System of Lay Agency; see

Lay Agency.
La Trobe, Rev. J. A., Scripture Illustra.

tions, 607.
Lay Agency, 665; inadequacy of the

ministry to the full diffusion of
the gospel, ib.; Works on the sub-
ject, 666 ; Dr. Matheson on prejudices
against lay agency, ib.; unscriptural
distinction between clergy and laity,
667; Jethro, 668 ; governing principle,
669; District Divisions, ib.; department
reluting to the congregation, 674 ; popu-
lation in the vicinage, 676 ; excellencies
of the plan, 678 ; its faults, 679 ;
every thing to be done by the churches,
ib.; "authority vested in the pastor,
680 ; preference to Dr. Matheson's

Essay, 681 ; Loan Tract System, ib.
Lepage's French Master for the Nursery,

and French School, parts 1 and 2,606.
London Exhibitions, 281 ; public taste

for sight-seeing subject for congratula-
tion, ib.; present attractions of Lon.
don, 283; Zoological Gardens, 28+;
Adelaide Gallery, 285; Polytechnic

Institution, 286 ; Tower, 287 ; Dio-
i rama, 290 ; British Museum, 293 ;

British Institution, ib.; Colosseum,
295; Royal

demy, ib.; Sur-

ins, ib.; Green-
wich Park

lwich Dockyard,

ib.; Kew Gar-
dens, ib

ter Abbey, 297 ;
spirit

ib.; importance of
free

8; improper beha-
viou

28, 299 ; increase of

tish Museum, 301 ;
im

the people at News

- cautions to visitors,
7

of a spirit of mutu

accommodation, 303 ; statistics of the
British Museum, 304; Armouries at the
Tower, ib.; Zoological Gardens, ib.;
Zoological Museum, 305; National
Gallery, ib.; gratification of curiosity

improving to the mind, ib.
Lyndhurst, lord, Speech of, see Session,

review of the.
Maclure, Dr. R., Praxis on the Latin

Potential and Subjunctive Moods, 605.
Marryat, Captain, Diary in America,

with Remarks on its Institutions, 422;
importance of collecting facts relating
to America, ib.; the author's object in
visiting the United States, 423 ; bis
self-complacency and bad taste, 424 ;
arrival at New York, 425 ; humouronis
anecdotes, ib.; Radicalism and Demo-
cracy, ib.; rise and present state of Buf-
fulo, 427 ; Mr. Rathbun, ib.; Canadian
provinces, 428 ; excitability of the Ame-
ricans, 430 ; interview with an editor of
a newspaper, ib.; American Museums,

the American Congress, 433;
prying disposition of the Americans,
434; character of the work, 436; mis-
taken view of the author on slavery,
ib.; rapid progress of anti-slavery
principles, ib.; his errors on the vo-
luntary system, 437; defects of the
book, 438.
Matheson, Dr. J., Our Country ; see Lay

Agency.
Miller, Thomas, Rural Sketches, 69;

acceptable character of the work to
those leaving town, ib.; absurd con-
duct of the fashionable world, 70 ; the
author's qualifications for describing
scenes connected with the working
classes, 71 ; their future influence on
literature, 72; present perverted
state of the press, ib.; character of the
book and its author, 73; Home reri-
sited, 74; arrangements for a marriage,
77 ; contrast between the poor in London
and the country, 79; the work warmly

commended, 81.
Milman, Rev. H. H., Life of Edward

Gibbon, Esq., 142; character of Gib-
bon, ib.; sketch of his biography, ib. et
seq.; birth and education, 143; cha.
racter of his aunt, ib.; their removal to
Westminster, 144 ; his intense read-
ing, 145; Magdulen College, ib.; prob.
able cause of his infidelity, 147; his
profession of Popery, 148 ; removal
to Switzerland, 149 ; his grateful regard
of M. Pavilliard, 149 ; study of the
classics, 150; revisits England, 151 ;
origin of his history, 152 ; Porson's
opinion of it, 153; the reception of
his history, 154 ; sketch of his work,
ib.; its completion and publication,

tract, 156 ; again retires to Switzer-

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
« 前へ次へ »