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powered with it, and so burdened, that he in a desert, merits a place in our notes as had repeatedly prayed, that God would well, as in his laconic jourval.--The retake some of it away, lest he should sink finement of a town in the midst of the and die under it."

woods, the family having been deposited Journal. “ These creatures (Freewill here (New Durham) by the whirlwind of Baptist preachers] mark out with their the times. Three lovely children, edueye one or two, whom they intend con- cated from the alphabet by an intelligent verting at one of their meetings; and their and polished mother, showed discernment, object is usually effected. For, if they can feeling, and proficiency; which, in a hoá make them cry, then quiet, and prevail on vel, and in such a place, surprised me. them to go into the water; the work in their Two of them, about five and seven, read a opinion, is effected.”—“ But they do not morning and evening prayer with the eloalways succeed.

The following was re quence of devotion; recited the commandlated to me by a respectable attorney, ments with correctness and interest; while who was an eye and ear witness of the one, the eldest, a sensible boy, was so fact, having been at a quarterly meeting overcome, after having been addressed on of the Freewillers at Sanbornton. He the subject of religion, as hardly to speak. said, there was a great many preachers, –Upon questioning the amiable and euand a vast multitude of people collected to lightened parent, relative to her personal hear; and that while he was present one religion, I found that her mind was not J-B-was the principal speaker. He decided; but her heart was tender, and she began his discourse on a cart, and at first melted into tears. I left the cot, between addressed himself to the people collectively. wbich and its furniture, as well as tenants, But, observing a girl, standing near him there was an utter contrast, much pleased in the crowd, whom he knew, he imme- with having stumbled upon such an interdiately turned from his sermon (if sermon view from mistaking my way, and resolved, it might be called) and began to converse if possible, to repeat my visit.” with her; whose given name was Mercy. He first described the bodily agonies of families, equally lovely and interesting,

We cannot but suppose that many other her father, when dying, to which he was a witness; but did not succeed in bring- America are extensive; and they must be

might be found; but the wildernesses of ing her to tears. He then painted the dy sought at the imminent danger of worse ing convulsions of her mother; and en

than “ mistaking the way." deavoured to imitate the contortions of nature, in her last moments. Here he succeeded, and brought the girl to tears; for It will be remembered, that this work is the recollection was too painful, to bear an official publication by a Society conwithout emotion. The preacher then sisting in great part of ministers, who are called with a loud voice, is there no one, well aware of the infidelity to which Amewho will pray for poor Mercy?' Upon rica is exposed, for lack of knowledge. which one rushed through the crowd, They are endeavouring as a part of duty to knelt by her side, and began to scream as God and man, to stem the torrent of these loud as he was able. A second and a third evils; in which all must wish them success. came in like manner, and added their We forbear from asking many questions, voices to the one, who was already voci which the papers suggest,—but, it cannot ferating. B-theu jumped from his cart, be taken amiss, if we enquire, Whether and came to her side; and in the midst of under such circumstances it was the duty their prayer repeatedly spoke to her so as of America to send missionaries abroad, or to be heard by the people, now is your to have directed their efforts to the convertime to be converted; and, if you are not sion of the worse than heathen populaconverted now, you never will be. And tion, at home? sometimes he would say,(O, horrid blas Compare pp. 469. 470. phemy) • Now Jesus, convert her, for thou

A fact that deserves notice, is stated in dever canst bave so favourable an oppor a note to one of the Missionary Reports, tunity; and, if thou dost not now couvert

viz. that one of the missionaries employed her, thou never const.' --Upon which some walked from twelve to twenty miles every one, who had more sense, or more kind day, for three months together, preached, ness for the girl, than others, came through exhorted, &c. and kept his health perfectly the crowd, took her by the hand, and led all the time, living only on milk. “He cerher from the horrid scene.''

tainly would not have been equally well,

in these wilds, under equal fatigue, had he, One solitary exception, to our Mission as most do-indulged himself in the use of ary unexpected and delightful, as the rose ardent spirits.

MEMOIRS OF

COMMONLY CALLED

ATHENIAN STUART.

it follow's of course that he must be considered as a pupil of that artist.

In this situation be continued till the year JAMES STUART,

1742," when he set out for Italy to prose

cute his studies as a painter; the most auAbstracted from the fourth Volume of the Antiquities thentic account of him is to be found in the of Athens ; lately published.

preface to the first volume of the AntiquiJAMES Stuart was born in Creed-lane then at Rome, where we had already em

ties of Athens, p. 5: he says, “ we were Ludgate-street, London, in the year 1713. His father was a native of North Britain, ployed six or seven years in the study of

painting, and there it was that towards the and a mariner by profession.. James was end of the year 1748, I first drew up a the eldest son : the father died when he brief account;" &c. &c. and from that time was very young, and left bis widow with till his return to England, he was steadily several children in distressed circumstances; they were supported, and finally established employed in carrying into execution the

design in which he had embarked. in the world, by exertions of the subject of

In some papers which have been comthis memoir.

municated to the Editor of this volume by Considering the circumstances of his fa- the family of Mr. Reyett, it is stated, “that mily, it is probable that James received the design of visiting and drawing the Anbut a common education. An anonymous tiquities of Athens, originated with Mr. writer in the Gentleman's Magazine says, Revett and Mr. Gavin Hamilton, the pain“ at a very early age, his taste and industry ter; whose knowledge of the temper, in drawing were exercised in designing talents, acquirements, and reputation of and painting fans for Goupy of the Strand; Stuart, induced them to persuade him to and he thus contributed very essentially to join them in an undertaking, from which, the support of his mother and her family." in the enthusiasm of youthful hope, they This account is probably correct: the writer of this Memoir has seen all Mr. Stuart's promised themselves pleasure, honour, and

great emolument." origival drawings of his views in Athens,

The speculative turn of Hamilton's mind, &c.; they perfectly answer the description

as shewn in the whole of his conduct of them given by himself in the preface to through life, renders it probable that the the first volume of th Antiquities of

design originated with him; and both Athens, being executed with great care Revett and himself evinced their judgment and attention, to make them fac-simile de and good sense in inviting Stuart to join lineations of the places represeuted, with them. How it came to pass that Hamilton out any endeavour to improve them by at- abandoned his part of the design, it is tempts at picturesque effect; they are done impossible now to know; but he was never in that most uotractable of all modes of before mentioned as being in any way painting called body colours, in which all

concerned in it. the fan-painting of that time was perform

It cannot now be discovered what branch ed, and which, in a higher department of of the art of paiuting Stuart practised to the art was practised with success, by support himself during the six or seven Marco Ricci, March, &c. &c. but most years of his residence in Italy, before he successfully by Goupy himself: this artist engaged in this undertaking; but it is was likewise an eminent engraver, as

certain that during that time he acquired must be acknowledged by those who all the literary knowledge which he has examine the prints of Castel Gandolphio, displayed in the work, and an acquaintance after F. Bolognese, but more especially with those sciences, which enabled him the Death of Pyramus and Thisbe, after afterwards to engage practically in the Nicolo Poussin; he was celebrated for profession of an architect. his copies or imitations of Salvator Rosa,

While at Athens, and previously to his performed in body colours; and the copy, departure from Rome, Stuart was liberally he made from the Pyramus and Thisbe of assisted with money by the Earl of Malton, the same size as the print, is perhaps the afterwards Marquis of Rockingham, Lord finest specimen of that mode of painting Charlemont, Mr. Dawkins, &c. who, with which exists. If an artist, possessed of much talents, was obliged to support himself J. Hawkins, of Bignor Park, Sussex, is by selling fans, and employed Stuart to in possession of a portrait of Stuart in paint them, there can be no doubt but that Crayons by himself. On it is a ticket he gave him both information and instruc- marked, “ Class 121, S. the fourth premium, tion during that time; if the fact that he three guineas." The head is that of a boy was so employed by Goupy be established, of thirteen or fourteen.

many other noblemen and gentlemen, pro- | cester-square. The professed object of this moted with great zeal the subscription to Society was to examine and discuss subthe intended publication ; but it is not jects of Grecian literature and antiquity, known that he had acquired any patron in though, at the time, it was pretended, that his architectural profession, until after the the political proceedings of the Rockingpublication of the first volume in 1762. It ham party were arranged there. The Marwas published in a style that gave the quis's late sister, Lady Charlotte Wenthighest satisfaction, and excited a wish to worth, continued her friendship to Mr. see the completion of the work, which, by Stuart's orphan family to the end of her a concurrence of circumstances, many of life. He likewise supported an intimacy which cannot now be detailed, has not with our lamented circumnavigator Cook, taken place till the present time.

which continues between the remains of On the publication of the first volume, their respective families. The late Sir the knowledge of Grecian art burst upon Philip Stevens, first, secretary to, and afthe public in all its splendour ; its au- terwards one of the Lords of the Admithoro acquired the surname of “ Athe- ralty, was his intimate friend: he, as well nian," par ercellence; was chosen a mem as Stuart, owed the foundation of bis forber of the Royal Society, and the Society of tune to the patronage of Lord Anson; this Antiquaries; and became afterwards a it is probable, produced an intimacy bemember of the Dilletanti Society : hetween them, which lasted as long as the acquired the patronage of many noble life of Stuart; and Sir Philip continued families in his profession of an architect, his friendship to the family of his departed and had as much employment as he chose friend until his own life terminated. Mr. to accept: as a designer he was frequently Stuart was warmly patronized by the late applied to, on subjects not merely archi- Earl Spencer and the first Lord Camden, tectural, when any thing peculiarly ele- from his arrival in England till his Lordgant was required; of these I shall only ship's death. Ile numbered among his numention the medals that were struck to merous friends the late Daniel Wray, Esq. commemorate Lord Clive's victory at Plas- of Richmond: to the friendship of Mr. sey, the taking of Guadaloupe, the battle Wray's late widow, Stuart's only surviving of Minden, and the medal given by the So- daughter has been greatly indebted. ciety for the encouragement of Arts, &c. Mr. Stuart was twice married: by his all of which are conceived in the purest first wife he had one son, who died at an style of Grecian art; many others pro. early age; by his second he had five chilbably exist, of which the present writer dren, one of which died a short time before has no knowledge. If Mr. Stuart had himself; bis eldest daughter died of a dechosen to make a large fortune, he had cline some years afterwards; his eldest son more favourable opportunities of doing so was in the navy, and died in the year 1800 ; than most men in his profession; he had the youngest son is in the same profession, introduced into Britain the knowledge of a | and has attained to the rank of lieutenant, style of art, which, though the oldest in and the youngest daughter is still living. existence, was new to this country, and Mr. Stuart died Feb. 2, 1788, in the 75th every person of good taste admired and year of his age, and was buried in the vault was willing to adopt it; but, baving acquired of the church of St. Martin in the fields. a competence by other means, be soon Having said thus much of his history, it withdrew from the practice of his profession, may be proper to add something of his cha, to enjoy the society of his friends, and the racter. as an artist, in which light alone he comforts of his family, in the way that was will be known to posterity. most congenial to his feelings and habits of If it be true that the character of an life.

artist is best known by his works, the mes Lord Anson, who had early patronised mory of Stuart will be respected by his Stuart, procured for him the place of countrymen as long as a taste for the real Sarveyor to Greenwich hospital, which beauties of architecture shall remain among being almost a sinecure, and the income them. considerable, added to the property he had Stuart's literary reputation was first esalready acquired, and placed bim in a tablished by a . Latin work written at state of independence equal to his wishes. Rome, and published at the expense of the

Stuart's distinguished friend and patron Pope, in the year 1750: it is entitledthe Marquis of Rockingham, was one of a

“ De Obelescó Cæsaris Augusti, Campo society which consisted of many noblemen Martis Nuperrime Effoso, Epistola, Jacobi and gentlemen who were connected with Stuart, Angli, ad Carolum Wentworth, the Rockingham party, and which held a Comitem de Malton." This work proweekly meeting at Stuart's house in Lei-cured him the honour of being presented

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he preaches the scripture very well, but, or twenty families of the regular order. they can read that at home; and are not Middleton and New Darham, if possible, satisfied, unless a minister preach some are in a more deplorable state.". thing, that is not in the Bible, viz. some “ There are about thirty ordained and thing. he has immediately received from licensed preachers in this vicinity, and Heaven. Those, who are impious enough about sixty, who preach and exhort in to say God has commanded them to preach their public assemblies. Among the whole so and so, however contradictory to one uot one has much more than a common another, are heard with attention, as mes school education, many with difficulty sengers from Ileaven. What among them, read a pslam or hymn, and some cannot fills me with the greatest horror, is the fa- read, so as to convey the sense. Most of miliar and profane manner, they speak of, the Calvinistic Baptist preachers are o and to, God. In their prayers they address good moral character, but some are not the Saviour with this tiile, brother Jesus;' | All the others are Antinomian, and shape and many other expressions they use, cal their course accordingly. No violation of culated to bring religion into contempt." the divine or of human laws occasions any

* Some of their exhorters observed that, breach of charity or fellowship among 'when any thing was strongly impressed them.” on their minds, though forbidden in the They believe a person may be regeneBible, they chose to follow their inward rated, 'more times thau ovce; and that it light, against the light of Scripture.'-A is common for 'nen to be perfect in this man, who at times was a teacher among fe. Que of their distinguished leader, them, spoke much of the success of a Mr. in conversation witb a Missionary, de Clarke, as a preacher, who, he said, was clared that he himself was as perfect

, a unable to read the scriptures."

Jesus Christ. They believe that learning You ask, “how any denominations in is unnecessary, as a qualification for the cach towut --In every town may be found ministry. The more there are speaking Congregationalists, Calvinistic Baptists, at once, and the louder they se ream, the Methodists, Universalists. Freewiliers, and greater, in their opinion, is the power of Christyans. At Meredith Bridge about the Spirit. The word of God is despised, one third are Congregationalists, four or

when it opposes revelations, communicated five Calvinistic Baptists, anu six or seven to them. - The Christyans in many respecta Freewillers, two or three inclining to Uni- harmonize with the Freewillers; but are versalism; the rest have their religion yet distinguished in the following particulars

. to choose, who will be likely to fall in with Their professors belong to no church, are any man of popular talents. The Second subject to uo discipline, and believe it of division in Meredith_is principally Freewillers. The Third Division is made up supper. They deny the foreknowledge of

do consequence to partake of the Lord's of Calvinistic Baptists and Congregational. God in all instances, and that he is acists, most however of the first.

Centre

quainted with many things, now taking Harbor is about equally divided into Me-place. They hold that the wicked are to thodists and Congregationalists, with a

be burnt up, and cease to exist after the few Freewillers. Tuftonborough has about judgment of the great day.” thirty five families of Congregationalists, the rest Freewillers and Christyuns. Wolf

It cannot be wondered at, that the people borough is divided in much the same man

so taught, or rather untaught, should be Alton is wholly carried away by

chargeable with “ lying, drunkenness

, unFreewillers and Christynns, except fifteen cleanness, sabbath breaking, fraud, and

thest.” The methodists are better in some We are sorry to say that the same in- respects; for when they can no longer cautious aud irreverent manner of expres- hide the wickedness of their adherents

, sion has its counterpart in London : a mi- | they shut them out of their societies. They nister in the act of praying, has been heard have their rival preachers also, io some to say, “ Brother Jesus! if you don't do so places : who anathematize each other. and so, I shall make my complaint, and Thus the kingdom was divided against tell your Father of you! It is no excuse to itself; and the people knew not, which to say this must be the language of an igno- discredit; as they believed both to be sent rant Fanatic: granted ;-but why does the them from Heaven, with the counsels of respectable denomination which knows the Most High.” — In conversation with this-we suppress its appellation—keep this W she asked him, whether he such a man in its connection, and continue enjoyed as much of religion, to compliment him with the title of “ the To which he replied, 0 yes, and a great Rørerend Mr.

deal more ;-that he had been 60 over

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as he wished

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powered with it, and so burdened, that he in a desert, merits a place in our notes as had repeatedly prayed, that God would well, as in his laconic journal.--The retake some of it away, lest he should sink finement of a town in the midst of the and die under it."

woods, the family having been deposited Journal. “ These creatures [Freewill here (New Durham) by the whirlwind of Baptist preachers] mark out with their the times. Three lovely children, edueye one or two, whom they intend con- cated from the alphabet by an intelligent verting at one of their meetings; and their and polished mother, showed discernment, object is usually effected. For, if they can feeling, and proficiency; which, in a hoá make them cry, then quiet, and prevail on vel, and in such a place, surprised me. them to go into the water; the work in their Two of them, about five and seven, read a opinion, is effected.”. But they do not morning and evening prayer with the eloalways succeed.

The following was re quence of devotion; recited the commandlated to me by a respectable attorney, ments with correctness and interest; while who was an eye and ear witness of the one, the eldest, a sensible boy, was so fact, having been at a quarterly meeting overcome, after having been addressed on of the Freewillers at Sanbornton. He the subject of religion, as hardly to speak. said, there was a great many preachers, -Upon questioning the amiable and euand a vast multitude of people collected to lightened parent, relative to her personal hear; and that while he was present one religion, I found that her mind was not J-B was the principal speaker. He decided; but her heart was tender, and she began his discourse on a cart, and at first melted into tears. I left the cot, between addressed himself to the people collectively. which and its furniture, as well as tenants, But, observing a girl, standing near him there was an utter contrast, much pleased in the crowd, whom he knew, he imme- with having stumbled upon such an interdiately turned from his sermon (if sermon view from mistaking my way, and resolved, it might be called) and began to converse if possible, to repeat my visit." with her; whose given name was Mercy. He first described the bodily agonies of families, equally lovely and interesting,

We cannot but suppose that many other her father, when dying, to which he was

might be found; but the wildernesses of a witness; but did not succeed in bringing her to tears. He then painted the dy-sought at the imminent danger of worse

America are extensive; and they must be ing convulsions of her mother; and en

than “ mistaking the way." deavoured to imitate the contortions of nature, in her last moments. Here he succeeded, and brought the girl to tears; for It will be remembered, that this work is the recollection was too painful, to bear an official publication by a Society conwithout emotion. The preacher then sisting in great part of ministers, who are called with a loud voice, “is there no one, well aware of the infidelity to which Ame. who will pray for poor Mercy?' Upon rica is exposed, for lack of knowledge. which one rushed through the crowd, They are endeavouring as a part of duty to knelt by her side, and began to scream as God and man, to stem the torrent of these loud as he was able. A second and a third evils; in which all must wish them success. came in like manner, and added their We forbear from asking many questions, voices to the one, who was already voci- which the papers suggest,—but, it cannot ferating. B-theu jumped from his cart, be taken amiss, if we enquire, Whether 1 and came to her side; and in the midst of under such circumstances it was the duty

their prayer repeatedly spoke to her so as of America to send missionaries abroad, or : to be heard by the people, now is your to have directed their efforts to the conver

time to be converted; and, if you are not sion of the worse than heathen popula

converted now, you never will be.' And tion, at home? e sometimes he would say,(0, horrid blas Compare pp. 469. 470. ephemy) • Now Jesus, convert her, for thou

A fact that deserves notice, is stated in dever canst bave so favourable an oppor. Ja note to one of the Missionary Reports, tuuity; and, if thou dost not now couvert

vir. that one of the missionaries employed her, thou never const:' -Upon which some walked from twelve to twenty miles every one, who had more sense, or more kind- day, for three months together, preached, ness for the girl, than others, came through exhorted, &c. and kept his health perfectly the crowd, took her by the hand, and led all the time, living only on milk. He cerher from the horrid scene.''

tainly would not have been equally well,

in these wilds, under equal fatigue, had he, One solitary exception, to our Mission as most do-indulged himself in the use of ary unexpected and delightful, as the rose ardent spirits.

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