Memoirs of the Affairs of Greece: Containing an Account of the Military and Political Events which Occurred in 1823 and Following Years

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J. Rodwell, 1831 - 338 ページ
 

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116 ページ - Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor,) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
142 ページ - No farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties from their dread abode (There they alike in trembling hope repose), The bosom of his Father and his God.
131 ページ - Who is nervous, if I am not ? And do not those other words of his, too, apply to my case, where he says that drawing blood from a nervous patient is like loosening the chords of a musical instrument, whose tones already fail for want of sufficient tension?
6 ページ - ... proposed employing him as physician to the Suliote corps he contemplated forming on the mainland. He even invited the young doctor to spend several days at Metaxata. When Millingen expressed surprise at the difference between Byron's views of the Greeks and those he had heard in England, the poet replied: "This should not surprise you, for I know this nation by long and attentive experience, while in Europe they judge it by inspiration. The Greeks are perhaps the most depraved and degraded people...
119 ページ - That wonderful elasticity of disposition, that continued flow of wit, and that facility of jest, by which his conversation had been so highly distinguished, returned only at distant intervals; for he fell into a state of melancholy. . . . Flashes before his eyes, palpitations and anxieties, hourly afflicted him; and at times such a sense of faintness would overpower him, that, fearing to be attacked by similar convulsions, he would send in great haste for medical assistance.
141 ページ - On hearing Fletcher's affirmative, he replied, " that's right." On the 18th he addressed me, saying: "Yourefforts V to preserve my life will be vain. Die I must: I feel it. Its loss I do not lament; for to terminate my wearisome existence I came to Greece. — My wealth, my abilities, I devoted to her cause. — Well : there is my life to her.
8 ページ - I especially dread, in this world, two things, to which I have reason to believe I am equally predisposed — growing fat and growing mad ; and it would be difficult for me to decide, were I forced to make a choice, which of these conditions I would choose in preference.
8 ページ - Even when en negligk, he studied the nature of the postures he assumed as attentively as if he had been sitting for his picture ; and so much value did he attach to the whiteness of his hands, that in order not to suffer " the winds of heaven to visit them too roughly," he constantly, and even within doors, wore gloves.
99 ページ - This woman and a few more, with their children — in all, twenty-two females — then formed the sole remains of the Mussulman population of Mesolonghi. They were all sent by Lord Byron to Prevesa. Vrachori, the capital of the province of Karlili, was the most important town in Western Greece. It...
133 ページ - In the morning (18th) a consultation was proposed, to which Dr. Lucca Vega and Dr. Freiber, my assistants, were invited. Dr. Bruno and Lucca proposed having recourse to antispasmodics and other remedies employed in the last stage of typhus. Freiber and I maintained that they could only hasten the fatal termination, that nothing could be more empirical than flying from one extreme to the other; that if, as we all thought, the complaint was owing to the metastasis of rheumatic inflammation, the existing...

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