Memoirs: A Twentieth Century Journey In Science And Politics

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Basic Books, 2009/09/09 - 672 ページ
Edward Teller is perhaps best known for his belief in freedom through strong defense. But this extraordinary memoir at last reveals the man behind the headlines--passionate and humorous, devoted and loyal. Never before has Teller told his story as fully as he does here. We learn his true position on everything from the bombing of Japan to the pursuit of weapons research in the post-war years. In clear and compelling prose, Teller chronicles the people and events that shaped him as a scientist, beginning with his early love of music and math, and continuing with his study of quantum physics under Werner Heisenberg. He also describes his relationships with some of the century's greatest minds--Einstein, Bohr, Fermi, Szilard, von Neumann--and offers an honest assessment of the development of the atomic and hydrogen bombs, the founding of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and his complicated relationship with J. Robert Oppenheimer.Rich and humanizing, this candid memoir describes the events that led Edward Teller to be honored or abhorred, and provides a fascinating perspective on the ability of a single individual to affect the course of history.
 

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Memoirs: a twentieth-century journey in science and politics

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At 93, Teller is one of the last living links to the golden age of 20th-century physics. He was there when quantum theory was conceived, he participated in the Manhattan Project, and he has been ... レビュー全文を読む

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Self-portrait of a man on dubious moral ground レビュー全文を読む

目次

Introduction
1
How Many Seconds in a Year? 19081913
3
Learning About War Revolution and Peace 19141919
8
The Other Side of the War Years 19141919
17
Romanian Interlude 19191920
24
My Name is KoKo 19201925
31
How to Become a Physicist the Hard Way 19261928
42
Brave New World 19281929
53
Our Doubts Have a Firm Foundation 1950
291
Damn the Torpedoes November 1950April 1951
309
Pleasures in the Pacific Perils at Princeton April 1951September 1951
320
The Campaign for a Second Weapons Laboratory November 1951JuLy 1952
330
The New Wheel Spins a Bit 19521954
343
Other Nuclear Affairs 19491955
360
The Oppenheimer Hearing April 12 1954May 6 1954
369
Sequelae June 1954February 1955
385

Journeymen Year in Physics 19291930
64
The Pleasures of Small Successes 19301933
72
The Future Becomes Obvious 1933
82
Copenhagen 19331934
94
The Joy of Being a Foreigner 19341935
109
First Years in the United States 19351941
122
Fission 19391941
138
Academicians Go to Work 19411943
153
Settling in at Los Alamos March 1943November 1943
166
On and Off the Mesa November 1943January 1945
184
An End A Beginning 1945
198
Give It Back to the Indians 19451946
213
Incomplete Answers 1946
228
Among Friends From Home February 1946June 1949
239
The Reactor Safeguard Committee 19471949
263
Twenty Years Too Soon June 1949January 1950
273
Three Friends August 1954August 1958
402
Down to Earth 19551958
415
The Directorship 19581960
436
A Few Lessons in Political Affairs 19551960
453
The Temperature of the Cold War Rises 19601965
463
Educating Inventive Engineers 19611975
476
Uphill 19641972
492
Choices Critical and Otherwise 19731979
514
Strategic Defense 19801992
525
Other IssuesPublic and Private 19801990
541
Homecoming 19902000 5 51
551
Epilogue
562
In the Matter ofJ Robert Oppenhetmer
570
Index
603
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著者について (2009)

Edward Teller was born in Hungary in 1908 and educated in Germany. He came to the United States in 1935. A theoretical physicist, he worked on nuclear weapons during and after World War II, and was instrumental in the development of the hydrogen bomb. A staunch advocate of national military preparedness, Teller has been involved in several controversies, most recently the debate regarding national missile defense. He helped found Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he is now Director Emeritus, and continues as a Senior Research Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.

Judith Shoolery is a former science teacher who has worked as a writer and editor on a variety of publications, most recently as a book editor at the Hoover Institution. Now retired, she and her husband live in Half Moon Bay, California.

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