Waterloo lectures, a study of the campaign of 1815

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232 ページ - MANUAL of the HISTORY of INDIA, from the Earliest Period to the Present.
139 ページ - ... his Marshal that, according to all the reports, three bodies of Prussians had made for Wavre. Grouchy "must therefore move thither — in order to approach us, to put yourself within the sphere of our operations, and to keep up your communications with us, pushing before you those bodies of Prussians which have taken this direction and which may have stopped at Wavre, where you ought to arrive as soon as possible.
180 ページ - For a battle there is not perhaps in Europe an army equal to the British ; that is to say, none whose tuition, discipline, and whole military tendency is so purely and exclusively calculated for giving battle. The British soldier is vigorous, well fed, by nature brave and intrepid, trained to the most rigorous discipline, and admirably well armed.
xii ページ - History,' thus lays down the true law which should constantly guide our researches : — ' It seems,' he says, ' to be often believed, and, at all events, it is perpetually assumed in practice, that historical evidence is different in its nature from other sorts of evidence. Until this error is effectually extirpated, all historical researches must lead to uncertain results. Historical evidence, like judicial evidence, is founded on the testimony of credible witnesses.
221 ページ - Allied army ; and against it he should have led his last man and horse, even had the risk been great in the highest degree — which, as has been seen, it clearly was not. Had Napoleon attacked the Anglo-Allied army with his whole force, and succeeded in defeating it, there could be little question of his being able to defeat afterwards the Prussian army...
68 ページ - This was a bad plan in every view, for apart from the dishonesty, they were ill served, and lost valuable time. As for messages taken on horseback, I have already said that no person took the pains to inquire if we had a horse that could walk, even when it was necessary to go at a gallop, or if we knew the country, or had a map. The order must be executed without waiting for the means, as I shall show in some special instances. This habit of attempting everything with the most feeble instruments,...
127 ページ - Army nothing but the fame of the past glories they had shared.2 42. Wellington's movement from Quatre Bras, the perfect way in which his strong cavalry and a single division of infantry masked the retreat of the rest, and the complete order...
149 ページ - ... to be always prepared to fall upon any of the enemy's troops which may endeavour to annoy our right, and crush them.
181 ページ - ... say, none whose tuition, discipline, and whole military tendency is so purely and exclusively calculated for giving battle. The British soldier is vigorous, well fed, by nature brave and intrepid, trained to the most rigorous discipline, and admirably well armed. The infantry resist the attacks of cavalry with great confidence, and, when taken in the flank or rear, British troops are less disconcerted than any other European army. These circumstances in their favour will explain how this army,...
197 ページ - Namur had been abandoned by the Prussians in their haste to concentrate on Ligny, and they had by their subsequent march northward left it uncovered. Could Grouchy once regain Sombreffe before the Prussians seized that point, he would have a clear passage along the great chausse"e which led from Nivelles into the place, with an equally good one beyond it up the Meuse by which to escape ; and his rear, covered by the works might file safely into France. Seizing rapidly at this hope, he despatched...

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