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1814.1 The Wandering Jew-Fever at Gibraltar..

228 his Itinerary, calls Magioninicum Magio- shalt tarry till I co ne.” Soon after he vinium, and Magintom; for which he was converted and haptized by the name assigns several reasons : first, it stands of Joseph. He lives for ever; but at upon a Roman way; secondly, Roman the end of every hundred years, falls in. coins have been found there ; and, to an incurable illness, and at length into thirdly, there is a great affinity between a fit of extasy, out of which when he reMadin Bowre and Mugintum."

covers, he returns to the same state of If, Sir, you should deem the above youth he was in when Jesus suffered, worthy a place in your truly esteemed being then about 30 years of age. He

publication, I, probably, shall take the remembers all the circumstances of the · liberty of troubling you again.. death and resurrection of Christ, the I am, &c.

saints that arose with him; the composPHILO-ANTIQUITATIS ing of the apostles' creed; their preach.

ing and dispersion; and is himself a very . The WANDERING JEW.

grave and holy person. This is the subTo the Editor of the New Monthly Magazine, stance of Matthew Paris's account, who SIR,

was himself a monk of St. Alban's, and ALTHOUGH I cannot reply directly was living at the time the Armenian to the query of your correspondent in bishop made the above relation." this month's Magazine, respecting the Several histories of the Wandering origin of the story of the Wandering Jew may be seen in Calmet's History of Jew, yet the following extract from Dr. the Bible, and there is an amusing letter Percy's introduction to an ancient ballad on the subject in the second volume of bearing that wame, may not be uninte- the Turkish Spy. I am, &c. resting to some of your readers.

VECTUS. “The story of the Wandering Jew is' Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, of considerable antiquity: it bad obtain Aug. 16, 1814. ed full credit in this part of the world beforc the year 1228, as we learn from Mat. RETURNS of the MORTALITY at GIBRALParis. For in that year, it seems, there Tar during the Fever there in 1804 came an Armenian archbishop into Eng and 1813, and state of the WEATHER land to visit the shrines and reliques pre- in 1811, 1812, and 1813. · terved in our churches, who, being enter- To the Editor of the New Monthly Magazine, tained at the monastery of St. Alban's, was asked several questions relating to THE inclosed tables relative to the his country, &c. Among the rest, a monk fever at Gibraltar, I received from a who sat near him enquired, if he had surgeon who attended the sick at that ever seen or heard of the famous person place, during the fatal visitation of that named Joseph, that was so much talked disease in 1804 and 1813. I presume of, who was present at our Lord's cruci- that they will be interesting to many of fixion, and conversed with him, and who your readers, and shall merely premise was still alive in confirmation of the that Dr. Burnete's late publication was Christian faith? The archbishop an- founded on the same observations. swered, that the fact was true : and af

I am, &c. terwards, one of his train, who was well. August 1, 1814. known to a servant of the abbot's, interpreting his master's words, told them in Return of the Inhabitunts and Soldiers French, that his lord knew the person who died of the Yellow Feder in 1804. whom they spoke of very well; that he Officers . . . . . . . 54 had dined at his table a little while be Soldiers . . . . . . . 864 fore he left the east: that he had been Soldiers' wives and children 164 contius Pilate's porter, by name Carti Inhabitants . . . . . . 4864 phalus, who, 'when they were dragging Jesus out of the door of the judgment

Total . . . . 5946 hall, struck him with his fist on the back, aying,' Go faster, Jesus, go faster; This melancholy mortality took place y dost thou linger?' Upon which, in about three months, and as many is looked upon him with a frown, and deaths were never recorded, this return u; 'I indeed am going; but thou is below the truth,

SIR.

R.

To

General Statement of New Cases and Deaths of the Epidemic Disease prevalent in Gibraltar, from 8th September to 4th

December, 1813.

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Officers

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25 65 18

60

54 10 134 101 104 81 34

94 199 181

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To September 17th..

24th..
October 1st. . . .

sth .
15th
22d .

29th ..
November 5th .

13th ..
20th ..

27 th .. Deceniber 4th ..

211
163
232
201
289

158
195

59
27

71 321 352 438 590 566 258 118 75 40

34 21 20 48

62

Mortality in Gibraltar by the Fever in 1818.

50 48 46 26

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17

Officers ............... 79 Royal Artillery .........

.
155 Royal Sappers and Miners.
123 |4th Royal Veteran Battalion ..
139 7th Ditto ......
175

lith Detachment .....
117

1\26th Regiment .......
31 137th Ditto .........
28 Foreign Regiments ...
14 | Barrack Department. ....

Soldiers' wives . ....... 4. Children ...............

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(Oct. 1,

225

STATE OF THE WEATHER IN GIBRALTAR, IN THE AUTUMNS OF THE YEARS 1811, 1812, & 1813.

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226

Etymology of Poetry, Parson, Physic. [Oct. 1, For the Vew Monthly Magazine. son Hornc. Would I could say that the ETIMOLOGY; or PHILOLOGICAL VENTI• clergy had been disrespectfully treated

LATIONS. By DUMFREE TELLFAIR, by the vulgar only; but have they not M.A. -Part Ii.

lately been contemptuously spoken of (Continued from Vol. I. p. 342.) and vilified, even in that house of parAFTER having sifted, or rather win- liament from which they are unconstitunowed, in some degree, the rudiments of tionally excluded, and therefore pregeneral literature, and having respectfully rented from defending themselves and addressed the two celebrated universi- their sacred office and was not this ties of this land, as the great focuses of during an unconstitutional debate (in learning and true wisdom, I come now February and March, 1813) about wheto notice, etymologically, the names of ther the constitution shall remain unimsome of the arts and sciences cultivated paired or not, which surely is virtually in those seniinaries,-such as poetry, (not virtuously) the same thing as de physic, law, &c.; and it may appear odd bating, whether the king shall reign or ihát só little notice seems to have been not? But lest I should become too seritaken of the extreme latitude or exten- ous, I shall defer other weighty matters siveness of some of their significations. I could urge on such a subject to a more A poet, mollys, for instance, is literally adequate occasion; merely observing furthe maker of something, so that poetry iher in this place, that these things tend must mean a thing made ; and pray, in to verify and render prophetic that famous this sense, what is there that is not poe- (or infamous) saying of the last-mentry? If, then, the tailor and the cord- tioned apostate, that “the infectious wainer are the poets of my coat and hand of a bishop bad been wared over shoes, then, whenever they may need him." alteration, the botcher and the cobler But to return to my proper subject. will be the proper critics. Now, might A similar generality of meaning attaches not music, from the muse, have served to the word physic, as derived froin queis, as a better title for this, than for the sise nature. But why nature? Is not this ter art which it does express? However, confounding it with physics, (a word not it is no matter; a poet is a name sanc- found in Johnson,) or physiology, i.e. tioned by use, and it leads to no ill natural philosophy ? Every genuine $clresults.

ence depends on Nature-astronomy, I am here strongly tempted to notice, mathematics, hydrostatics, projectilesby the bye, the still more ridiculous ge- every thing of this sort musi be founded neralism or anythingisin of the expres- on nature. Music depends on the air, sion, " person of a parish," which and the nature of sounds; and cookery word, somehow or other, perhaps through on the palate, and the nature of tastes; the vulgarity of sots in alehouses, by yet we call neither of these plıysic. Phyo changing the e into an a, is always pro- sic, indeed, comes in aid of injured or nounced parson; and this leads, through decayed nature; though sometimes, its awkward disagreeableness of sound, through the blunder of the practitioner, to extensively-ill results, by lessening the it may go directly contrary to it; since, reverence of the lower ranks for their therefore, it should not be identified with spiritual guides, whom their dearest in- it, medicine would surely bave been more terests require them to respect and vene- proper for its general appellation. rate. Aye, but the notable reason, for- Let me bere just mention, that Dr. sooth, is, that he is the person visibly Funnygreek (aware, perhaps, of this imrepresenting the benefice he holds. But propriety) derives physic from the human is not the king as truly a visible repre- phiz, or phyz; for so Johnson owns it sentative of his kingdom, the colonel of should be spelt, as a contraction of phy his regiment, and the cobler of his stall, siognomy. "The phyz, we know, is the &c. &c.? and yet surely we should not grand diagnostic or discoverer of the call them the persons or parsons of their state of the constitution; and as Johorespective possessions? Let me observe, son spells the word physick with a k, the then, that this vulgarism ought to be re- reason may be, that it principally regards moved; and that such an unmeaning, or the phyz when sickly, or indicative of all-meaning title should be changed into disease. Physiognomy also plainly points pastor, or something more respectable out the gnomon or nose, that proboscis though the present name might very well which is the index of the face, and suit those who desert or renounce the which, by synecdoche, might be taken clerical character, as, for instance, Par- for the face itself; whence come, perhaps, son Kidgell, Parson Wakefield, or Pare the words prognosis, diagnosis, &c.; and

1814.) Etymology of Law.

227 we know that the science itself is some- to be wanting, when, at first, the datimes styled nosology. This, however, I mages were laid at 40,0001, against four only hint, as a dose of criticism pre- printers or publishers, though prudence, scribed by the learned doctor, and which or a sense of shame, did afterwards lower the reader inay swallow, or not, just as them to only 10,0001., to be paid by two or he thinks proper.

three authors, who, though rich in learnBut what shall we say of law? This ing, virtue, and public spirit, were prosurely, at least, may bid defiance to verbially poor in pocket! Now, as I reevery attempt at analysis or derivation. member, that in the life of Wakefield,* Yet it may not be impossible to form the libel of which he was convicted is soide shrewd conjecture respecting its so extenuated and frittered away, as to probable origin. Let us consider:- be made into no crime at all; so I hope Law and Flaw, like Lloyd and Floyd, I shall incur no offence, either legal or seem to be so perfectly analogous, that moral, if I endeavour to extenuate the if not exactly identified, they must at imputed guilt of those who were the real least have originated the one from the defendants in the above-cited cause, viz, other. Now chance is allowed to pre- the authors of the Anti-Jacobin Review. dominate in the law, as appears from the Defendants, it seems, bad asserted, that favourite coast of its professors, “The glo- in consequence of the universal holy espirious uncertainty of the law;":(and may onage established among papists, the not chancery be derived from hence?) be- plaintiff must have known of the popish sides which, as flaws are often said to be insurrection before it broke out in 1803, fatal to a cause, there appears also to be which knowledge plaintiff did not deny; a fatality attending it. A flaw is, I pre- but then they unluckily go on to say, sume, generally speaking, occasioned by that “ the present administration are some blunder or omission of a clerk in convinced of his treachery, in not putoffice, and the natural offspring of flaw ting Government on their guard.” Here is ponsuit; as was the case in a legal it appears to me, as a plain man, that tnumph of the notorious Parson Horne, if there was any fault at all, it was in of patriotic memory, to which Foote is the reviewers, or in the government, for supposed to allude in his “Lame Lover," expecting impossibilities. How could where he says something about being they suppose that Dr. Troy, a popish "as merry and joyful as defendant when bishop, would be guilty of treachery plaintiff was nonsuited for leaving out towards his lawful prince, the pope of an s." But does not this imply that Rome, by betraying such a secret! He plaintiff had the merits, and must have seems to have acted in the best manner succeeded if the s bad not been omitted ? he was able; he could not serve two Here I own something seems to be wrong. masters; he naturally, therefore, served Io the republic of letters it is far other- him who was the favourite, and to whom wise. If any flaw or omission has taken he was under the strongest obligations. place, all the critics are on the alert to This, then, when rightly and dispassionset it right-whereas, in the other case, ately considered, turns out, instead of a an honest man must suffer, and the ends libel, to be a real panegyric, since it reof justice be defeated, because, though presents plaintiff as being an honest conall the legal critics, the judge, counsel, scientious Romanist, whom even proand jury, are well satisfied about the testants, like myself, must applaud ; and law, all of them yet refuse to amend it! yet the indictment charges defendants

Now, on the other band, let us sup- with “ maliciously intending to deprive pose a defendant who, while engaged in the plaintiff of his good name, fame, some innocent, or perhaps highly meri- character, and reputation, and to bring torious pursuit, shall, by a slip of the him into great infainy and disgrace!!!" tongue or pen, through human frailty I own I cau see nothing like infamy or and imperfection, offend against the strict disgrace in the whole atfair. The learned letter of those laws, which partake of

When sentence had been passed upon human imperfection themselves, then him by Sir Nash Grose, W. chose to pun, surely Messrs. Flaw and Nonsuit might and said it was very gross indeed. When be most admirably employed in rescuing James II. sent commissioners to expel the an unintentional delinquent from the president and fellows of Magdalen College, fanys of his merciless opponents? Of and put in papists, because the fellows, with this I do not know that I could bring an the excellent Bishop Hough at their head, mstance more in point than the famous modestly defended their own rights, one of cause, Troy o. Symonds, in 1805; and the commissioners said, “ We don't come nere a merciless spirit could not be said here to be huff'd.

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