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For the Lady's Miscellany. ON THE DEATH OF MR JOHN

KING Diata is the solemn end of ev'ry scene, And slikes imp essive on each wait.

ing mind : From his impending stroke no arm can

screen, And ought but SORROW dnes he

leave behind.

The hour arrived; 'nor could he longer

stay ; Jesus embraced him in the arms of

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'Sweet is thy name' he cried, and fed

away, To happier regions in the realms a.

bove. Farewell young fiend! why should we

longer mourn? True wehuse Lost, but thou has sure.

ly gaind: Would bui thi Gd help us to reach

wha bun : We too would triumph' in the prize

oblairci. We too must die; and enter Jonely grave; We 100 must die; and quit this earth.

ly cenie : But wer joice that Christ by Grace doll

Save, And humbly hope, our souls he will redeem.

GERA.

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TO A FRIEND -By Miss Balfour. of as thine eyes shall fondly trace

Each simpie wreath 1 turn'd for thee, Whate'er the time, whate'er the place,

O! think of me.

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Fell justly, by the course of law,
A liotim for un grand faux pas.
When he approached the fa al t.ee,
( Un autre place de Greve pour lui.)
Ind when Jack Keroh prepard to

tie The noose iha' did egalı him high, Instead of prying to be Lod Monsieur exclaim d. Sh misericorde !" Measure the cord' eplie Jack Keich, • Measure the cord yourself, you wretch.' Siil Misericorde ! was all his ery, • Al Misericorde dat should die!

h Misericorde! good folk,good bye! Measure the cord, you sriv'ling cor, Rejnin dibee s cutioner ; 'Tis long engh-1 kaw it will do To hang a score such ogues as you, And since nu e been a thiesing ell, Mestsure the cord, I say. jouli self.'

SELECTED

for the Lady's Miscellany.

A KISS.

Does Eliza remember, era fxshion had

laught her, To lend the beart's impulse lypocra

cy's guise, How oft, in our plays, to my bosom I

caught her, And wonder'd a touch could so

brighten her eyes?

PRINTING

AND

Familiarto me is the sweet recollection, How the wa mth of her lips taught

my visage to glow, While the blush that responsive iilumed

ber complexion Seem'd roses promiscuously scattered

BOOK-BINDING, Neatty and correctly executed, (on reasonable terms.) ai the

Office of the
LADY'S MISCELLANE.

on snow.

WANTED.

And I ask'd from what sourse sprang

the feelings which raptured And bade through pulses such ec.

stasy roll, The charm which reflection bewildered

and captured A KISS was the answer r-it melted

my SOUL.

Two or Three Young Ladies as Ap. prentices, to the Tüylors Business, ap. ply at No. 99 Cherry-street.

JACK KETCH and the FRENCHMAN.

A feu D'Esprit.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY

SAMUEL B. WHITE, NO. 23 Frankfort-street New York.

AT TWO DOLLARS PER ANNOM

A Frenchman once, at some assizes, ('Twas Nottingl.am the musesu! mises,)

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OR,

THE

WEEKLY

VISITOR.

FOR THE USE AND LÅ

EMENT OF BOTH SEXES.

VOL. XV.7

Saiurday, August 29,..... 1812

(NO 19.

TIE ISDIANS;

come forth to receive him. The

festival shall be prepa ed Ah me! A Tale,

Peradventure he hath perished !

Or now expires in some bourly By Wi'iam Richardson, professor

field ! impetuous in his valor, and of Humanity in the Universi

eager in the ardour of youth, perty of Glasgow (Scotland.)

chance he rushes on the foe,& fils!' MARANO, a miable in her sore \Vhile Marano tbus indulged her Foir, sat alone by a shelving rock. | inquietuda,, the venerubie OnonShe sought in solitude to indulge thio was drawing nigh to console the anguish of her soul. She her. He had pe zived ihe un. leaned on her snowy arm.

Her easiness of her soul, and had foltresses flowed careless to the

lowed her unobserved from the vil. gale. The blooming beauty of lage. He was the father of Oneyo, her complexion was flushed with one of the elders of the nation, leweepins. Her blue eyes were

vered for his wisdom, and beloved full of ender anxiety. And her for bis humanity. Temperare in boosom heaved with repeated

his youth, and active in his old sighs

age, he was vigorous and chearful.

The furonse on his brow were · When will he return!' she

not those of anxiery, but of vime, said, my beloved Oneyo! The

His

pect . He I long to behold him ? Ye waves of) with the affection of a father. • Be Ontario, convey him to his native comforted,' he said; give not thy shore ; restore him his friends, soul to despondency. The great restore hiin to my tender embrace. Spirit who rides in the whirlwind,

when shall I behold him? When and speaks from the passing thunwill the swift canoe come boiind der, the father and sovernor of all ing over the lake, and wafi the he. things, will protect thee. But to ro to his gladsome isle ! Yes,lhou meril his favour, he resigned to happy isle! Thy rocks, thy re bis will. It is impious to aniicisounding glades and thy forests pate misery and render ourselves shall then rejoice. Gladness shali unhappy before we are actualiy afbe in the village. The eldors shall ! Acted. Yet capricious inconsiste

husband of my effec:ions : How pico gaie was stately and his as.

5

ent mortals, tipid at once and pre of Briton, my brson glows with sumptuous, tremble with the ima

peculiar transport.' gination of danger, and complain as if their sufferings were real.

al. I fondly imagined,' answered the They create miseries tothemselves Indian, 'that you loved us. We and arrogan:ly charge them on the

named you after the manner of Almighty. Beware, my daughter our tribe! But your affections are beware of rebellion against the estranged,and you languish for the Almighty Spirit. If you repine land of your fathers. Ica'led you my inconsiderately, if you complain daughter ; but, Marano you would without actual cause, you rebel | leave me.' Ultering these words, He hath commanded us to be hap- he looked tenderly upon her. You py, he is ever offended with our

would leave me,' he repeated, disobedience ; but if we encourage

and a tear rose in his eye. Maragroundless anxiety, we disobey.

no was affected. She clasperl his By destroying your own tranquility hand and pressed it to her rosy you are no less an enemy to the lips. "No, I will never leave thee. general system of happiness he

My heart is thine and my beloved hath ordained, than if you injured | Oneyo's. I revere thee. Can I the peace of another.

Be com

torget thy compassion? Can I forforted. Oneyo may soon return

get the dreadful day when the loaded with the spoils of the Bri- Outagami, in an assembly of their ton, and extolled by the gallant nation, decreed me a sacrifice to warriors of France.'

their God Areskoui ? You

present at an embassy from your "To see my husband return in people. Oneyo in the bloom of safety,' she replied, is the sum early year's had accompanied his of my desires. To see him load - father. He was beside you. He ed with the spoils of the Briton || sighed when he beheld me weep. will be no a Jdition to my joy.' The ingAlas! I was feeble, friendIndian seemed astonished. Have less, and beset with foes. Oneyo you forgotten,'she continued, that

intreated you to relieve me. Your I myself am a Bricon? That I was

own beart was affccted, you intercarried violently from my father's posed in my behalf, you redeemed house, when the Quiagami ravag me and called me your's. Oneyo ed our land, and carried terror to hastened to my deliverance, he the ga'es of Albany ?. My parents loosened my fetiers, and clasped perished. I was yet a child ; bu: me to his breast. Our affection I remember the bloodly carnage. rew withrour years : You beheld My brother of riper years was l'es it with kind indulgence, and ra:ificued; but I became the prey of|ed our wishes with your consent. their fury. Since that tiroc, many I have heard of European refinescarsare elapsed; yet at the name . ments, of costly raiment and lofly

was

.

palaces ; yet to me the simplicity and the di sice of yieldin her conof these rocks and fores's seems solation, suspended and relieved far more deli; hiful. Butif Onego his sorrow.

• If my sin hath faila returns not, I am undone. Many | en,' he said. “ he baih fallen as moons have arisen since : with the becane a wa rior. His prise flower of our tibę, he ,eparted. ; shall be preserved by his kindred, The mations are already wailing and descend to pos erily in the for their sons.-Uneyo, alis! is war 5008 His name shall terrify impetuous, and the warrio:'s of the European, when the c'ief ins Albion are undaunted. The blood of future times, rushing finire of heir foes has already tinged the from their forest, shall sur oud Ohio ; Canado trembled at their bis habbitations at midnight, and approach, and may ere now have raise the yell of death in his ear. become the prize of their valour Oneyo shall not die unievenged.' An me! if thy son hath fullen, grief will subdue thee; I know

He shall not,' interrupred the the tenderness of ihine affection, it

Indian. The messengers of our will pull thee down to the grave.

misfortunes hovered, after the disWho then will be a comforter to

confiture of their allies, around the me? Who will be my friend ? A.

walls of Quebec. They surprised mong a strange people I have no

a party of the foe; they have father to protect me, no brother

brouxht captives to our island : to counsel and give me aid.'

The elders of the nation are now Önonthio was about to reply, assembled; they have donmed

them a sacrafice to the memory of when an Indian from the village accosted them. He told them

the dead ; and def-r heir execuwith a sorrowful aspect, that the

tion only till you" ar ival''Alas!"

said Marano, the sacrifice of a hopes of their tribe were blasted, for that some Indians of a neigh

captive will afford me small conso

lation. Will the death of a fue bouring nation, having returned

restore life to m from Canada, brought certain in.

fushand? Or

heal bis ghastiy wounds? Or letelligence of the total overthrow of

animate his brealhiess bosom? their friends ; that they had with

Leave me to my woe. Leave me difficulty escaped ; that Oneye Lea

to wail on these lone.y mountains. was seen fierce and intrepid in the

Here I will not long be a sojourheat of the battle ; that he was

I will away to my love. I surrounded by the foe, and must

will meet him beyond the desarts have fallen a victim to their fury.

in some blissful vailey where no Marano was overwhelmed. O bloody foe shall invade us. Leave nonthio heaved a sigh: But the

me to my sorrow, for I will not apless condition of his daughter, live.' She entreated in vain; The

ner.

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