The Observer: Being a Collection of Moral, Literary and Familiar Essays, 第 2 巻

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251 ページ - Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day, And with thy bloody and invisible hand Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me pale...
152 ページ - Or gravely try to read the lines Writ underneath the country signs; Or, " Have you nothing new to-day From Pope, from Parnell, or from Gay?" Such tattle often entertains My lord and me as far as Staines, As once a week we travel down To Windsor, and again to town, Where all that passes inter nos Might be proclaim'd at Charing- cross.
79 ページ - Homer, and no less evident than he does not know to whom they are to be ascribed; their high antiquity, therefore, is the only point, which this celebrated critic has put out of doubt. The Ilias Minor appears to have been a poem, which. includes the taking of Troy and the return of the Greeks : the incidents of the...
226 ページ - ... are actuated by the same guilty ambition in the opening of the story: both murder their lawful sovereign in the course of it: and both are defeated and slain in battle at the conclusion of it: yet these two characters, under circumstances so similar, are as strongly distinguished in every passage of their dramatic life by the art of the poet, as any two men ever were by the hand of nature. Let us contemplate them in the three following periods; viz. The premeditation of their crime; the perpetration...
105 ページ - Musaeus felt the sacred flame, And burnt for the fair Theban dame Antiope, whom mighty Love Made pregnant by imperial Jove ; The poet plied his amorous strain, Press'd the fond fair, nor press'd in vain. For Ceres, who the veil undrew, That screen'd her mysteries from his view, Propitious this kind truth reveal'd, That woman close besieg'd will yield.
165 ページ - It was impossible to give up the eyebrows, and it was no less impossible to have them upon any terms, but terms of honour. Jack married her: it was his humour, and all the world allowed he was in the right to indulge it: the happy knot was tied; Jack flew with lips of ardour to his lovely Cleopatra; the faithless eyebrow deserted from the naked forehead of its owner, and (O sad exchange!) took post upon Jack's chin. These, and many more than these, may be called cases in point, and brought to prove...
98 ページ - Thamyris' disgrace, Superior once of all the tuneful race, Till, vain of mortals' empty praise, he strove To match the seed of cloud-compelling Jove ! Too daring bard ! whose unsuccessful pride The' immortal Muses in their art defied.
107 ページ - Ev'n Sophocles, whose honey'd lore Rivals the bee's delicious store, Chorus'd the praise of wine and love, Choicest of all the gifts of Jove. Euripides, whose tragic breast No yielding fair one ever prest, At length in his obdurate heart Felt love's revengeful rankling dart, Thro...
45 ページ - ... own devising ; these are indispensable conditions ; the devil also exacts some rag or remnant of his vassal's garment, as a badge of allegiance, and compels him to make the oath within a circle drawn upon the ground (which being a figure without beginning or end is a symbol of divinity;) in this circle the figure of a cross is to be traced out, on which the magician elect tramples and kicks with disdain ; he then requests the...
77 ページ - I must think, of epic poetry, revolving in his capacious mind, the magnificent events of the Grecian association for the destruction of Troy, then fresh in the tradition, if not in the memories of his contemporaries, planned the great design of his immortal Iliad. With this plan arranged and settled in his thoughts beforehand, he began to give a loose to the force and powers of his imagination in strains and rhapsodies, which by frequent recitation fixed upon his memory, and, as he warmed with the...

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