Choosing Presidents: Symbols of Political Leadership

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Transaction Publishers, 1992 - 354 ページ
In Choosing Presidents, Novak uses the election of an American president as a means to dissect the symbols of our national life and politics, exposing many as distorted perceptions of American realities. This work is a guide to the complexities of electoral politics and a lasting contribution to our understanding of the presidency.The author is Michael Novak.

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目次

PRIEST PROPHET KING
1
Symbolic Realism
3
What Are Symbols?
6
Who Are We?
12
Unseen Power
15
Egalitarian and King
19
Five Elements of Symbolic Power
29
Making the Most of Improbable Talents
32
Traditional Symbols
163
New Hampshire Snows
166
The Wallace Sun
179
McCarthy in Illinois
190
Sorting Out in Wisconsin
197
Together with McGovern at the Garden
217
The Shooting of Governor Wallace
229
Eight Major Presidential Symbols
232

A Professionals Memo
41
The Liturgy of Leadership
48
MORALISM AND MORALITY
55
Being Moral and Being Practical
57
The Constituency of Conscience
63
That Word Moral
69
Vietnam More Moral Than Thou?
74
The Rise and Fall of Liberal Moralism
87
Beyond Niebuhr Symbolic Realism
93
THE CIVIL RELIGIONS OF AMERICA
103
The Nation with the Soul of a Church
105
The Innocence Lingers On
111
The Civil Religions
123
Five Protestant Civil Religions
131
HighChurch America
137
The Second Great Tradition
147
SYMBOLS OF 1972
161
A NEW AND DARK FAITH
239
America as a Business
241
Three Corruptions
247
Reforming the Presidency
258
The Necessity of Dirty Hands
270
The Dark Night of Faith
286
The New Dark Civil Religion
302
AFTERWORD
311
Carters Hidden Religious Majority
313
Rival Visions of Community 1988
320
Moiling Muddling and Malaise
334
Miracle in the Desert
337
A Select Bibliography
341
Index
345
Abzug Bella 275
347
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145 ページ - Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God: and each invokes his aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered — that of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has his own purposes. " Woe unto the world because of offenses! for it must needs be that offenses come; but woe to that man...
145 ページ - Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding.
154 ページ - I walked the floor of the White House night after night until midnight; and I am not ashamed to tell you, gentlemen, that I went down on my knees and prayed Almighty God for light and guidance more than one night.
141 ページ - Truman, reverend clergy, fellow citizens, we observe today not a victory of party, but a celebration of freedom - symbolizing an end, as well as a beginning signifying renewal, as well as change.
142 ページ - Now the trumpet summons us again — not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulanon," a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself.
27 ページ - His is the only national voice in affairs. Let him once win the admiration and confidence of the country, and no other single force can withstand him, no combination of forces will easily overpower him.
50 ページ - The use of words is to express ideas. Perspicuity, therefore, requires not only that the ideas should be distinctly formed, but that they should be expressed by words distinctly and exclusively appropriated to them. But no language is so copious as to supply words and phrases for every complex idea, or so correct as not to include many equivocally denoting different ideas.
154 ページ - Orient — that would be bad business and discreditable ; (3) that we could not leave them to themselves — they were unfit for self-government — and they would soon have anarchy and misrule over there worse than Spain's was; (4) that there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them, and by God's grace do the very best we could by them as our fellowmen for whom Christ also died.
84 ページ - America was the most powerful nation in the world we passed on the other side of the road and allowed the last hopes for peace and freedom of millions of people to be suffocated by the forces of totalitarianism. And so tonight — to you, the great silent majority of my fellow Americans — I ask for your support.

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