The Complete Children's Short Stories

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Wordsworth Editions, 2005 - 854 ページ

The Jungle Book introduces Mowgli, the boy foundling adopted by a family of wolves, Shere Khan the tiger, Bagheera the black panther and Baloo the sleepy brown bear.

How did the Leopard get his spots? How did the Elephant get his trunk? In Just So Stories Kipling wittily supplies the answers to these and other questions.

Puck of Pook's Hill relates how Dan and Una's magical meeting with Puck, the last of the People of the Hills, leads to their adventures with Romans and Crusaders, Saxons and Vikings... And later, in Rewards and Fairies, the three meet an array of characters ranging from Iron Age warriors to 'Good Queen Bess' and Sir Francis Drake.

In Kipling's rattling school yarn Stalky & Co, Stalky, M'Turk and the Beetle are a trio of scallywags with a keen desire to break the rules, their unruly activities give the stories an enduring appeal to all children - especially those who have ever wilted beneath the stern glance of a peevish schoolmaster.

Kipling's wry, sometimes tongue-in-cheek style will delight and entertain young readers while adults throughout the world will remember his stories with affection.

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目次

How Fear Came
133
The Miracle of Purun Bhagat
149
Letting in the Jungle
161
The Undertakers
181
The King Ankus
199
Quiquern
213
Red Dog
231
The Spring Running
249
Sir Richards Song
413
Thorkilds Song
432
The Runes on Welands Sword 433
448
A BritishRoman Song
461
A Song to Mithras
475
A Pict Song
492
A Charm
535
Cold Iron
550

THE OUT SONG
264
How the Whale got his Throat
271
How the Camel got his Hump
277
How the Rhinoceros got his Skin
283
How the Leopard got his Spots
289
The Elephants Child
297
The SingSong of Old Man Kangaroo
305
The Beginning of the Armadillos
311
How the First Letter was written
321
How the Alphabet was Made
331
The Crab that Played with the Sea
343
The Cat that Walked by Himself
355
The Butterfly that Stamped
365
Pucks Song
381
A Tree Song
396
The LookingGlass
564
King Henry VII and the Shipwrights
578
Brookland Road
594
Song of the Mens Side
608
In Ambush
715
Slaves of the Lamp Part One
733
An Unsavoury Interlude
747
The Impressionists
765
The Moral Reformers
781
A Little Prep
796
The Flag of Their Country
811
The Last Term
826
Slaves of the Lamp Part Two
841
著作権

多く使われている語句

著者について (2005)

Kipling, who as a novelist dramatized the ambivalence of the British colonial experience, was born of English parents in Bombay and as a child knew Hindustani better than English. He spent an unhappy period of exile from his parents (and the Indian heat) with a harsh aunt in England, followed by the public schooling that inspired his "Stalky" stories. He returned to India at 18 to work on the staff of the Lahore Civil and Military Gazette and rapidly became a prolific writer. His mildly satirical work won him a reputation in England, and he returned there in 1889. Shortly after, his first novel, The Light That Failed (1890) was published, but it was not altogether successful. In the early 1890s, Kipling met and married Caroline Balestier and moved with her to her family's estate in Brattleboro, Vermont. While there he wrote Many Inventions (1893), The Jungle Book (1894-95), and Captains Courageous (1897). He became dissatisfied with life in America, however, and moved back to England, returning to America only when his daughter died of pneumonia. Kipling never again returned to the United States, despite his great popularity there. Short stories form the greater portion of Kipling's work and are of several distinct types. Some of his best are stories of the supernatural, the eerie and unearthly, such as "The Phantom Rickshaw," "The Brushwood Boy," and "They." His tales of gruesome horror include "The Mark of the Beast" and "The Return of Imray." "William the Conqueror" and "The Head of the District" are among his political tales of English rule in India. The "Soldiers Three" group deals with Kipling's three musketeers: an Irishman, a Cockney, and a Yorkshireman. The Anglo-Indian Tales, of social life in Simla, make up the larger part of his first four books. Kipling wrote equally well for children and adults. His best-known children's books are Just So Stories (1902), The Jungle Books (1894-95), and Kim (1901). His short stories, although their understanding of the Indian is often moving, became minor hymns to the glory of Queen Victoria's empire and the civil servants and soldiers who staffed her outposts. Kim, an Irish boy in India who becomes the companion of a Tibetan lama, at length joins the British Secret Service, without, says Wilson, any sense of the betrayal of his friend this actually meant. Nevertheless, Kipling has left a vivid panorama of the India of his day. In 1907, Kipling became England's first Nobel Prize winner in literature and the only nineteenth-century English poet to win the Prize. He won not only on the basis of his short stories, which more closely mirror the ambiguities of the declining Edwardian world than has commonly been recognized, but also on the basis of his tremendous ability as a popular poet. His reputation was first made with Barrack Room Ballads (1892), and in "Recessional" he captured a side of Queen Victoria's final jubilee that no one else dared to address.

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