Tracts, Chiefly Relating to Ireland: Containing: 1. A Treatise of Taxes and Contributions. II. Essays in Political Arithmetic. III. The Political Anatomy of Ireland

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Boulter Grierson, 1769 - 488 ページ
 

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234 ページ - That formerly it abounded with gold but now there is a great scarcity both of gold and silver. That there is no trade nor employment for the people and yet that the land is underpeopled. That taxes have been many and great. That Ireland and the plantations in America and other additions to the Crown are a burden to England.
279 ページ - An Account of the Wealth and Ex-pences of England, and the Me-[thod of raising Taxes in the most equal | manner.
25 ページ - ... out of the proceed of his Harvest, and also, what himself hath both eaten and given to others in exchange for Clothes, and other Natural necessaries ; that the remainder of Corn is the natural and true Rent of the Land for that year ; and the medium of seven years, or rather of so many years as makes up the Cycle, within which || Dearths and Plenties make their revolution, doth give the ordinary Rent of the Land in Corn.
viii ページ - I willingly resign my soul into his hands, relying only on his infinite mercy, and the merits of my Saviour, for my happiness after this life, where I expect to know and see God...
341 ページ - Picture-maker, suppose, make Pictures at 5 /. each; but then, find that more Persons would employ him at that rate than his time would extend to serve them in, it will certainly come to pass that this Artist will consider whether as many of those who apply to him at 5 /. each Picture, will give 6 /. as will take up his whole time to accommodate; and upon this Computation he pitcheth the Rate of his Work.
25 ページ - Seed wherewith to sowe the same. I say, that when this man hath subducted his seed out of the proceed of his Harvest, and also, what himself hath both eaten and given to others in exchange for Clothes, and other Natural necessaries; that the remainder of Corn is the natural and true Rent of the Land for that year; and the medium of seven years, or rather of so many years as makes up the Cycle, within which Dearths and Plenties make their revolution, doth give the ordinary Rent of the Land in Corn.
340 ページ - C. weight of such Flesh, which I suppose fifty days Food, and the Interest of the Value of the Calf, is the value or years Rent of the Land. But if a mans labour for a year can make the said Land to yield more than sixty days Food of the same, or of any other kind, then that overplus of days food is the Wages of the Man; both being expressed by the number of days food.
viii ページ - I die in the profession of that faith and in the practice of such worship as I find established by the law of my country, not being able to believe what I myself please, nor to worship God better than by doing as I would be done unto, and observing the laws of my country, and expressing my love and honour to Almighty God by such signs and tokens as are understood to be such by the people with whom I live, God knowing my heart even without any at all.
132 ページ - Without the knowledge of the true number of People, as a Principle, the whole scope and use of the keeping Bills of Births and Burials is impaired ; wherefore by laborious Conjectures and Calculations to deduce the number of People from the Births and Burials, may be Ingenious, but very preposterous.
234 ページ - ... have been great. The Fire at London, and Disaster at Chatham have begotten opinions in the vulgus of the world, to our prejudice. The Nonconformists increase [!] The people of Ireland think long of their Settlement. The English there, apprehend themselves to be aliens, and are forced to seek a trade with foreigners, which they might as well maintain with their own relations in England. But notwithstanding all this, the like whereof was always in all places, the buildings of London grow great...

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