Illustrated History of Ancient Literature: Oriental and Classical

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Harper & bothers, 1888 - 432 ページ
 

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168 ページ - One may see by what is left of them, that she followed nature in all her thoughts, without descending to those little points, conceits, and turns of wit, with which many of our modern lyrics are so miserably infected. Her soul seems to have been made up of love and poetry : she felt the passion in all its warmth, and, described it in all its symptoms.
169 ページ - Blest as the immortal gods is he, The youth who fondly sits by thee, And hears and sees thee all the while Softly speak and sweetly smile.
170 ページ - Thou once didst leave almighty Jove And all the golden roofs above: The car thy wanton sparrows drew, Hovering in air they lightly flew; As to my bower they winged their way 1 saw their quivering pinions play.
246 ページ - Then he turned to us, and added with a smile: I cannot make Crito believe that I am the same Socrates who have been talking and conducting the argument; he fancies that I am the other Socrates whom he will soon see, a dead body — and he asks, How shall he bury me? And though I have spoken many words in the...
78 ページ - The ancients who wished to illustrate illustrious virtue throughout the empire, first ordered well their own States. Wishing to order well their States, they first regulated their families. Wishing to regulate their families, they first cultivated their persons. Wishing to cultivate their persons, they first rectified their hearts.
59 ページ - Let no man think lightly of evil, saying in his heart, It will not come near unto me. Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot is filled; the fool becomes full of evil, even if he gathers it little by little.
89 ページ - ... The poetical conformation of the sentences, which has been so often alluded to as characteristic of the Hebrew poetry, consists chiefly in a certain equality, resemblance, or parallelism between the members of each period ; so that in two lines (or members of the same period) things for the most part shall answer to things, and words to words, as if fitted to each other by a kind of rule or measure.
409 ページ - Ah, fleeting spirit ! wandering fire, That long hast warm'd my tender breast, Must thou no more this frame inspire ? No more a pleasing cheerful guest ? Whither, ah whither art thou flying ! To what dark, undiscover'd shore ? Thou seem'st all trembling, shivering, dying, And wit and humour are no more ! LETTER VIL PROM MR.
77 ページ - Learning without thought is labour lost; thought without learning is perilous.' CHAP. XVI. The Master said, The study of strange doctrines is injurious indeed!' CHAP. XVII. The Master said, 'Yu, shall I teach you what knowledge is? When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to allow that you do not know it;— this is knowledge.
79 ページ - While there are no stirrings of pleasure, anger, sorrow, or joy, the mind may be said to be in the state of ; EQUILIBRIUM. When those feelings have been stirred, and they act in their due degree, there ensues what may be called the state of HARMONY. This EQUILIBRIUM is the great root from which grow all the human actings in 'the world, and this HARMONY is the universal path which they all should pursue. 5. Let the states of equilibrium and harmony exist in perfection, and a happy order will prevail...

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