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itten in its author's best style, and contains a mass of facts and sentiments, that deserve the attention of all who have to do with the young men of the present age.

So bighly do we venerate the memory of Dr. Isaac Watts, that we are disposed to commend every effort that is intended to do him honour. We cannot, however, approve of a work now in the course of publication, entitled “ The Ilustrated Watts's Hymns, edited by the Rev. Alexander Fletcher," two numbers of which are now before us. Dr. Watts's Hymns are not capable of successful graphic illustrations, and do not need them, if they were. An edition of the good Doctor's Hymns for Children might be more appropriately illustrated with some such embellishments, but those who go to the house of God to sing “Spiritual Songs," will surely put away these " childish things."

The Answer to the Question, “What must I do to be Saved ?" by Rev. James Morrison, is a cheap, and extremely useful tract, that deserves extensive circulation.

The taste for what are called “the people's editions" has produced several series of valuable works of an instructive character, adapted for general readers. This method has been imitated by the theological booksellers, who have issued “The Christian Library Edition," “ Christian Literature," and “ Library of Standard Divinity." The last, published by Messrs. Ward & Co., printed in double columns, medium octavo, and on fine paper, now extends to twenty-five parts, each of which is complete in itself. We cannot attempt to characterize each distinct work, but the series comprizes Expository Works, such an“ Dickson on the Hebrews," “ Hutchinson on John," and Bush's "Notes on Joshua and Judges ;" the latter is reprinted from an American edition, and is a valuable addition to our stock of commentaries on select books of Scripture : also works on Systematic Theology, as Archbishop Leighton's “Theological Lectures,” Dr. Griffin's " Lectures on Important Doctrines of Christianity," and Professor Stort and Flatt's “ Elementary Course of Biblical Theology;" the two last are also reprinted from American works : Dr. Porter's “ Lectures on Homiletics and Preaching," delivered at Andover, and Dr. Skinner's “ Aids to Preaching," deserve a place in the study of every minister. We have only room to mention, that the publishers have conferred no small obligation on young ministers and students, by the present edition of Jahn's “ Biblical Antiquities," and his “History of the Hebrew Commonwealth," which abound with Scriptural facts and illustrations of the highest value. Sincerely do we wish that the liberal patronage of the religious public may remunerate the spirited publishers for their great expense in bringing out this valuable Standard Library.

Mr. Isaac Taylor continues to prosecute his researches in “ Ancient Christianity;" the sixth number of which, relating principally to the demonolatry of the church in the fourth century, is now before us, and deserves, like the whole series, the serious study of all those who are interested in the Oxford controversy. Although Mr. Taylor strongly disclaimed nonconformity in his first number, yet he is fighting the Puseyites on the good old principles of nonconformity, the only principles on which, we take it, a successful stand can be made against the pretensions of Oxford and Rome. We sincerely thank him for the good service he has already rendered to the cause of truth, and hope to have an opportunity of exhibiting the claims of this work upon the esteem of the Christian public.

The Rev. Alexander Carson, M.A. has published a reply to President Beecher, entitled "Baptism not Purification," characterized by high critical pretensions, and a tone of severity and arrogance, that does not, in our judgment, harmonize with " the meekness of wisdom."

" The Works of Josephus" should be found in the library of every student of the Scriptures, and the new edition of Mr. Whiston's translation, published by Mr. Virtue, appears to be accurate, convenient, and economical.

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trated Commentary on the Old and New Testaments, chiefly explanatory of the manners and customs mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures, and also of the History, Geography, Natural History, and Antiquities." The notes are not devoted either to the inculcation of the sentiments or the doctrines of the sacred writers, but to the elucidation of the sense by all the evidences that criticism, science, and discovery afford. They are written by a gentleman who has traversed the countries of the East in search of such illustrations, and whose intelligent remarks are aided by “many hundred wood-cuts from the best and most authentic sources.” The same publisher has put forth “ The Illuminated Atlas of Scripture Geography: a series of Maps, delineating the Physical and Historical Features in the Geography of Palestine and the adjacent countries : accompanied with an explanatory notice of each map, and a copious index of the names of places. By W. Hughes, P.R.G.S." It is adapted in size to “ The Pictorial Bible,” to which it forms an appropriate companion.

The work of foreign missions has a favourable influence upon the intelligence of all its supporters, who cannot trace the spheres of missionary labour without becoming better acquainted with the nations of the earth. We are happy, then, to see that Mr. Snow, who, some time since, published a cheap edition of our lamented Williams's “ Missionary Enterprizes,” for half-a-crown, has just issued, in one thick volume, in the same form and type, Messrs. Tyerman and Bennett's “ Voyages and Travels round the World,” who were “ deputed from the London Missionary Society to visit their various stations in the South Sea Islands, Australia, China, India, Madagascar, and South Africa." These are “compiled from original documents by James Montgomery," of Sheffield. This second edition is corrected, and illustrated with twenty-six engravings, and for seven shillings supplies the whole of that interesting and instructive work, which was originally published in two octavo volumes, at a guinea and a half !

The deep interest that is now felt in the proper training of ministers for our churches is one of the most hopeful circumstances connected with our body. We have now before us a proof of this in two addresses, delivered at the midsummer recess to the students of our Yorkshire Colleges, at Rotherham and Airdale, the former by Mr. Hamilton, of Leeds, “ Hints on a Noviciate in Theology," and the latter by Mr. Kelly, of Liverpool, “ Humility Recommended." These admirable discourses must have been heard by our young brethren with a thrilling interest, and few older ministers can read them, we think, without emotion and profit too.

The pithy and pointed papers of the venerable John Cooke, of Maidenhead, were originally published, with an able and deeply interesting memoir, by Dr. Redford. They are now published separately, in two duodecimo volumes, entitled " Select Remains." They are well adapted to inform the understandings, and to school the hearts of those who read them.

Dr. John Morison's “ Family Prayers for every Morning and Evening throughout the Year, with Additional Prayers for Special Occasions," is a beautiful volume, handsomely printed, by Messrs. Fisher and Co., in imperial octavo. It contains seten hundred and twenty-eight prayers, for the fifty-two weeks, original and selected, none of which exceeds a page in length.The editor's character is a pledge of the evangelical sentiments and Christian spirit they express, and to those who use such aids in the devotions of the family we can cordially recommend this elegant volume.

Miss Pardoe's “ City of the Magyar, or Hungary and her Institutions in 1839-40," (3 vols. post 8vo,) is not much in our way. It contains, however, many lively sketches of a people but little known to the rest of Enrope. The state of religion amongst the different denominations is described as being far from satisfactory.

When a book has reached its fifth edition, it needs not our commendation; yet it is a duty which should have been performed long since, to state, that the prize essay, by Dr. F. A. Cox, entitled “Our Young Men— their Importance and Claims," is

written in its author's best style, and contains a mass of facts and sentiments, that deserve the attention of all who have to do with the young men of the present age.

So highly do we venerate the memory of Dr. Isaac Watts, that we are disposed to commend every effort that is intended to do him honour. We cannot, however, approve of a work now in the course of publication, entitled “ The Illustrated Watts's Hymns, edited by the Rev. Alexander Fletcher," two numbers of which are now before us. Dr. Watts's Hymns are not capable of successful graphic illustrations, and do not need them, if they were. An edition of the good Doctor's Hymns for Children might be more appropriately illustrated with some such embellishments, but those who go to the house of God to sing "Spiritual Songs," will surely put away these " childish things.”

The Answer to the Question, “What must I do to be Saved ?" by Rev. James Morrison, is a cheap, and extremely useful tract, that deserves extensive circulation.

The taste for what are called “the people's editions" has produced several series of valuable works of an instructive character, adapted for general readers. This method has been imitated by the theological booksellers, who have issued “The Christian Library Edition," “ Christian Literature," and “ Library of Standard Divinity.” The last, published by Messrs. Ward & Co., printed in double columns, medium octavo, and on fine paper, now extends to twenty-five parts, each of which is complete in itself. We cannot attempt to characterize each distinct work, but the series comprizes Erpository Works, such an“ Dickson on the Hebrews,” “Hutchinson on John," and Bush's “ Notes on Joshua and Judges ;" the latter is reprinted from an American edition, and is a valuable addition to our stock of commentaries on select books of Scripture: also works on Systematic Theology, as Archbishop Leighton's * Theological Lectures," Dr. Griffin's “ Lectures on Important Doctrines of Christianity," and Professor Storr and Flatt's “ Elementary Course of Biblical Theology;" the two last are also reprinted from American works : Dr. Porter's “ Lectures on Homiletics and Preaching," delivered at Andover, and Dr. Skinner's “ Aids to Freaching," deserve a place in the study of every minister. We have only room to mention, that the publishers have conferred no small obligation on young ministers and students, by the present edition of Jahn's “ Biblical Antiquities," and his “History of the Hebrew Commonwealth," which abound with Scriptural facts and illustrations of the highest value. Sincerely do we wish that the liberal patronage of the religious public may remunerate the spirited publishers for their great expense in bringing out this valuable Standard Library.

Mr. Isaac Taylor continues to prosecute his researches in " Ancient Christianity;" the sixth number of which, relating principally to the demonolatry of the church in the fourth century, is now before us, and deserves, like the whole series, the serious study of all those who are interested in the Oxford controversy. Although Mr. Taylor strongly disclaimed nonconformity in his first number, yet he is fighting the Puseyites on the good old principles of nonconformity, the only principles on which, we take it, a successful stand can be made against the pretensions of Oxford and Rome. We sincerely thank him for the good service he has already rendered to the cause of truth, and hope to have an opportunity of exhibiting the claims of this work upon the esteem of the Christian public.

The Rev. Alexander Carson, M.A. has published a reply to President Beecher, entitled “ Baptism not Purification," characterized by high critical pretensions, and a tone of severity and arrogance, that does not, in our judgment, harmonize with " the meekness of wisdom.”

* The Works of Josephus" should be found in the library of every student of the Scriptures, and the new edition of Mr. Whiston's translation, published by Mr. Virtue, appears to be accurate, convenient, and economical.

THE EDITOR'S TABLE.

A Winter in the West Indies. By Joseph John Gurney. London: John Murray, 8vo.

Poems : by a Slave in the island of Cuba, recently liberated. Translated from the Spanish by R. R. Madden, M.D. 8vo. London: Thomas Ward.

The City of the Magyar; or, Hungary and her Institutions in 1839-40. By Miss Pardoe. 3 vols. post 8vo. London: Geo. Virtue.

Pastoral Annals. By an Irish Clergyman. 12mo. London: R. B. Seeley and W. Burnside.

History of the Christian Church; from the First to the Nineteenth Century. By Christiana Buchan. 12mo. Edinburgh: W. Oliphant and Son.

Records of Wesleyan Life. By a Layman. 12mo. London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co.

Sketches of Sermons on Types and Metaphors. By a Dissenting Minister. 12mo. London: Geo. Wightman.

A Help to the Unlearned in Reading the Epistles. By a Clergyman, A. M. 8vo. London: G. & S. Seeley.

The Christian Visitor; or, Select Portions of the Old Testament. By the Rev. W. Jowett, M. A. 12mo. London: R. B. Seeley and W. Burnside.

Peace for the Christian Mourner; or, Extracts from various Christian Authors on the subject of Affliction. Selected by Mrs. Drummond. 12mo. London : Seeley and Burnside.

Christ, the theme of the Christian Missionary. By the Rev. Octavius Winslow. 12mo. London: Thomas Arnold.

Naomi; or, the Last Days of Jerusalem. By Mrs. J. B. Webb. 12mo. London : Harvey and Darton.

The Bible Monopoly inconsistent with Bible Circulation. A Letter to the Right Honourable Lord Bexley. By Adam Thomson, D. D. 8vo. London: John Snow.

The Hebrew Grammar of Gesenius. Translated from the 11th German edition, by T. J. Conant. 8vo. London: Ward and Co.

Library of Standard Divinity. Memoir of the Rev. T. Paston, D. D. of Portland, United States. By the Rev. Asa Cummings. Medium 8vo. London : Ward and Co.

An Apology for Christianity; or, Modern Infidelity Examined. In a series of Letters to Robert Owen. By Brewin Grant. 8vo. London: Simpkin and Marshal.

Tendrils Cherished; or, Home Sketches. By E. B. 18mo. London: W. Houlston.

Tales of the Blest. A Poem. By Richard Barker. 2d edit. 24mo. Shetford : J. Priest.

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.

Now ready, by a Quadragenarian in the Ministry, The Reconciler, an Essay, exhibiting in a somewhat new light the Harmony of the Government and the Grace of God, as well as of a Universal Provision and a Sovereign Election.

Dr. Young is about to publish a second edition of his Scriptural Geology, with an Appendix, containing Strictures on some passages of Dr. J. Pye Smith's Lectures, entitled, Scripture and Geology; particularly his theory of a Local Creation and a Local Deluge.

Mr. J. E. Ryland is preparing a translation of Dr. Neander's History of the Planting and Training of the Christian Church by the Apostles, (2nd edit. Hamburgh, 1838, 2 vols. 8vo,) the first volume will shortly appear in the Biblical Cabinet.

CHRONICLE OF BRITISH MISSIONS.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.

With the year of grace 1841, we commence the Chronicle of British Missions in connexion with the Congregational Union of England and Wales. Thoughts and feelings, more than can now be uttered, crowd in upon our minds in connexion with this announcement. We prefer to set out a calm, explanatory statement of our design, and our anticipations. The title adopted for this department of our periodical, presents the several points, which, successively and briefly noticed, will unfold the views, for which, with earnestness and respect, we ask the attentive consideration of our readers.

Missions. We are to record the progress,—the triumphs, we hope,-of missions. If there be glory and hope in the church in our days, they are associated with her missions. That word embodies the spirit, the enterprise, the policy of our age. Whatever is diffusive, benevolent, energetic, great, in the Christian character and movements of our times, works in our missions. In this mighty, sublime project all the advantages that have descended to us from the past are employed, all our hopes. and labours for the future are embodied.

British Missions.—The benevolence of British Christians working for the salvation of the ungodly, the perishing of their own countrymen-efforts to promote the Christianity of that country, from which, as from its chiefly earthly source, religion is to fiow to all lands—to sustain, by that sure spread of virtue and public spirit which cannot fail to attend an increase of vital godliness, the liberty and institutions of a country destined to be in these things the model and instructress of a regenerated world—to cause evangelical truth to pervade our empire at home, in Ireland, in the colonies—to appeal to the combined patriotism of the piety of every British Christian. In this great work, not less the dictate of wisdom, than the impulse of zeal, we hope faithfully to record the labours and successes of the Congregational churches -a work advocated, not as the rival, but as the coadjutor of every similar enterprise. Its success must enlarge their resources.

British Missions in connexion with the Congregational churches--Christ's glorious gospel preached in accordance with the cherished theology of British Independentsthe good old way—the sound truth of our fathers—the glorious gospel, the un. searchable riches of Christ, as understood and taught by Owen, Howe, Doddridge, equally remote from antinomian and arminian tendencies—missions conducted in harmony with the ecclesiastical polity of Independents-labouring to plant and multiply churches of that scriptural order-intended to diffuse the knowledge and influence of their free constitution, pure discipline, and spiritual character-an object confessed to be subordinate, but contended for as an important part of the revealed will of Christ, and as at this juncture obviously associated in our country with all that is sacred and precious in pure, evangelical Christianity.

British Missions connected with the Union of the Congregational churches-a union as blessed in fact, as it is sweet in theory a union which, founded in the liberty, agreement, and affection of the Congregational brotherhood, gives practical

N, S. VOL. V.

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