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“You're welcome hame, my Montagu'! CARLE, NOW THE KING'S COME; Bring in your hand the young Buc

cleuch; I'm missing some that I may rue

Carle, now the King's come!

BEING NEW WORDS TO AN AULD

SPRING.

(On the occasion of George IV's visit Come, Haddington”, the kind and gay, to Scotland, August, 1822.) You've graced my causeway mony a

day; The news has flown frae mouth to

I'll weep the cause if you should stay-
mouth,
The North for ance has bang'd the

Carle, now the King's come !
South;
The deil a Scotsinan's die o' drouth,

'Come, premier Duke", and carry doun Carle, now the King's come !

Frae yonder craig his ancient croun;

It's had a lang sleep and a soun'-
CHORUS

But, Carle, now the King's come!
Carle, now the King's come!
Carle, now the King's come ! ‘Come, Athole, from the hill and
Thou shalt dance, and I will sing,

wood,
Carle, now the King's come !

Bring down your clansmen like a clud;

Come, Morton, show the Douglas'
Auld England held him lang and fast; blood, -
And Ireland had a joyfu' cast;

Carle, now the King's come !
But Scotland's turn is come at last-
Carle, now the King's come!

1 Lord Montagu, uncle and guardian to the young

Duke of Buccleuch, placed his Grace's residence of Auld Reekie, in her rokelay grey,

Dalkeith at his Majesty's disposal during his visit to

Scotland.
Thought never to have seen the day ; 2 Charles, the tenth Earl of Haddington, died in 1828.

3 The Duke of Hamilton, as Earl of Angus, carried He's been a weary time away

the ancient royal crown of Scotland on horseback in But, Carle, now the King's come!

King George's procession, from Holyrood to the
Castle.

aids ;

'Come, Tweeddale, true as sword to Again I heard her summons swell, sheath;

For, sic a dirdum and a yell, Come, Hopetoun, fear'd on fields of It drown'd Saint Giles's jowing belldeath ;

Carle, now the King 's come ! Come, Clerk', and give your bugle breath;

My trusty Provost, tried and tight, Carle, now the King's come! Stand forward for the Good Town's

ght, Come, Wemyss, who modest merit

There's waur than you been made a

knightCome, Rosebery, from Dalmeny

Carle, now the King's come! shades; Breadalbane, bring your belted plaids; My reverend Clergy, look ye say Carle, now the King's come ! The best of thanksgivings ye ha'e,

And warstle for a sunny day'Come, stately Niddrie, auld and true, Girt with thesword that Minden knew;

Carle, now the King's come ! We have o'er few such lairds as you

• My Doctors, look that you agree, Carle, now the King's come!

Cure a' the town without a fee; King Arthur's grown a common crier, My Lawyers, dinna pike a pleaHe's heard in Fife and far Cantire,

Carle, now the King's come ! “ Fie, lads, behold my crest of fire !” Carle, now the King's come! "Come forth each sturdy Burgher's

bairn, Saint Abb roars out, “ I see him pass, That dints on wood or clanks on airn, Between Tantallon and the Bass!”

That fires the o'en, or winds the pirnCalton, get out your keeking-glass

Carle, now the King's come ! Carle, now the King's come !' The Carline stopp'd; and, sure I am,

Come forward with the Blanket Blue"; For very glee had ta'en a dwam,

Your sires were loyal men and true, But Oman ? help'd her to a dram.—

As Scotland's foemen oft might rueCogie, now the King's come!

Carle, now the King's come! Cogie, now the King's come! "Scots downa loup, and rin, and rave, Cogie, now the King's come!

We're steady folks and something I'se be fou' and ye's be toom,

grave, Cogie, now the King's come!

We'll keep the causeway firm and

brave

Carle, now the King's come! PART SECOND. A Hawick gill of mountain dew,

"Sir Thomas 4. thunder from your rock, Heised up Auld Reekie's heart, I trow,

Till Pentland dinnles wi' the shock, It minded her of Waterloo

And lace wi' fire my snood o'smokeCarle, now the King's come!

Carle, now the King's come!

I Clerk of Pennycuik, bound by his tenure, when the King came to Edinburgh, to receive him at the Harestone with three blasts on a horn,

2 Landlord of the Waterloo Hotel.

3 The Blue Blanket is the standard of the incorporated trades of Edinburgh.

4 Sir Thomas Bradford, then commander of the forces in Scotland.

“Melville, bring out your bands of blue, Knight Mareschal, see ye clear the A’Louden lads, baith stout and true,

gateWith Elcho, Hope, and Cockburn Carle, now the King's come!

tool_ Carle, now the King's come! Kind cummer, Leith, ye've been

mis-set,
‘And you, who on yon bluidy braes But dinna be upon the fret -
Compell’d the vanquish'd Despot's Ye'se hae the handsel of him yet,
praise,

Carle, now the King's come!
Rank out-rank out-my gallant
Greys 2–

“My daughters, come with een sae Carle, now the King's come!

blue,

Your garlands weave, your blossoms *Cock o' the North, my Huntly braw,

strew; Where are you with the Forty-twas?

He ne'er saw fairer flowers than

youAh! wae's my heart that ye’re awa'

Carle, now the King's.come!
Carle, now the King's come!

• What shall we do for the propineBut yonder come my canty Celts, With durk and pistols at their belts,

We used to offer something fine, Thank God, we've still some plaids But ne'er a groat’s in pouch of mineand kilts

Carle, now the King's come !
Carle, now the King's come!

Deil care-for that l’se never start, • Lord, how the pibrochs groan and

We'll welcome him with Highland yell !

heart; Macdonnell's* ta'en the field himsell,

Whate'er we have he's get a partMacleod comes branking o'er the fell Carle, now the King's come ! Carle, now the King's come !

I'll show him mason-work this day• Bend up your bow each Archer spark, Nane of your bricks of Babel clay, For you're to guard him light and But towers shall stand till Time's dark;

away--Faith, lads, for ance ye’ve hit the Carle, now the King's come !

mark Carle, now the King's come! • I'll show him wit, I'll show him lair,

And gallant lads and lasses fair, Young Errols, take the sword of state,

And what wad kind heart wish for The sceptre, Panie-Morarchatee;

mair? 1 Lord Melville was Colonel of the Mid-Lothian

Carle, now the King's come! Yeomanry Cavalry; Sir John Hope of Pinkie, Major; and Robert Cockburn, Esq., and Lord Elcho, were captains in the same corps.

"Step out, Sir John', of projects rife, 2 The Scots Greys, under General Sir James Stewart of Coltness, were on duty at Edinburgh during the Come win the thanks of an auld wife, King's visit. Bonaparte's exclamation at Waterloo was, : Ces beaux chevaux gris, comme ils travaillent !

And bring him health and length of 3 Marquis of Huntly, Colonel of the 42nd Regiment.

life4 Colonel Ronaldson Macdonnell of Glengarry. 5 The Earl of Errol is hereditary Lord High Carle, now the King's come !' Constable of Scotland.

G A corruption of the Gaelic Banamhorar.Chat, or the Great Lady (literally Female Lord of the a Sr John Sinclair,' patron and projector of national Chatte); the Celtic title of the Countess of Sutherland. an I patriotic plans,' says Lockhart.)

One volume more, my friends,

one volume more ; ONE VOLUME MORE.

We'll restore Banny's manhood (1823.)

in one volume more. (Written for the Bannatyne Club.)

John Pinkerton next, and I'm truly

concern'd Assist me, ye friends of Old Books I can't call that worthy so candid as and Old Wine,

learn’d; To sing in the praises of sage Ban He rail'd at the plaid and blasphemed natyne,

the claymore, Who left such a treasure of old And set Scots by the ears in his one Scottish lore

volume more. As enables each age to print one One volume more, my friends, volume more.

one volume more, One volume more, my friends,

Celt and Goth shall be pleased one volume more,

with one volume more. We'll ransack old Banny for one Asbitter as gall, and as sharp as a razor, volume more.

And feeding on herbs as a Nebu

chadnezzar, And first, Allan Ramsay was eager

His diet too acid, his temper too sour, to glean

Little Ritson came out with his two From Bannatyne's Hortus his bright

volumes more. Evergreen;

But one volume, my friends, one Two light little volumes (intended for

volume more, four)

We'll dine on roast-beef and print Still leave us the task to print one

one volume more.
volume more.
One volume more, &c.

The stout Gothic yeditur', next on the

roll, His ways were not ours, for he cared With his beard like a brush and as not a pin

black as a coal, How much he left out, or how much And honest Greysteel that was true to

he put in ; The truth of the reading he thought | Lent their hearts and their hands each was a bore,

to one volume more. So this accurate age calls for one One volume more, &c. volume more.

Since by these single champions what One volume more, &c.

wonders were done, Correct and sagacious, then came my

What may not be achieved by our
Lord Hailes,

Thirty and One?
And weigh'd every letter in critical Law, Gospel, and Commerce

count in our corps,
scales,
But left out some brief words, which

And the Trade and the Press join for the prudish abhor,

one volume more. And castrated Banny in one volume

One volume more, &c.
1 James Sibbald.

the core,

we

more.

2 David Herd,

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Ancient libels and contraband books, By a rowt in the papers-fine place I assure ye,

for such matters. We'll print as secure from Exchequer I have, therefore, to make it for once or Jury;

my command, sir, Then hear your Committee and let That my gudeson shall leave the them count o'er

whole thing in my hand, sir, The Chiels they intend in their | And by no means accomplish what three volumes more.

James says you threaten,
Three volumes more, &c.

Some banter in Blackwood 1 to claim

your dog-Latin. They'll produce your King Jamie, the I have various reasons of weight, sapient and Sext,

on my word, sir, And the Bob of Dumblane and her For pronouncing a step of this sort Bishops come next;

were absurd, sir. One tome miscellaneous they'll add to Firstly,

erudite sir, 'twas against your store,

your advising Resolving next year to print four I adopted the lines this monstrosity volumes more.

lies in;
Four volumes more, my friends, For you modestly hinted my English
four volumes more;

translation
Pay down your subscriptions for Would become better far such
four volumes more.

dignified station.
Second-how, in God's name, would

my bacon be saved,

By not having writ what I clearly EPISTLE

engraved ?

On the contrary, I, on the whole, TO HIS SON-IN-LAW, JOHN GIBSON LOCK

think it better HART,

To be whipped as the thief, than his MAIDA'S EPITAPH.

lousy resetter. (1824.)

Thirdly, don't you perceive that I Maidae marmorea dormis sub imagine Maida !

don't care a boddle Ad januam domini sit tibi terra levis.'

Although fifty false metres were flung "Dear JOHN, I some time ago wrote

at my noddle, to inform his

For my back is as broad and as hard Fat worship of jaces, misprinted for as Benlomon''s, dormis;

And I treat as I please both the But that several Southrons assured

Greeks and the Romans; me the januam

Whereas the said heathens might Was a twitch to both ears of Ass

rather look serious Priscian's cranium.

At a kick on their drum from the You, perhaps, may observe that one scribe of Valerius 2. Lionel Berguer,

And, fourthly and lastly-it is my In defence of our blunder appears

good pleasure a stout arguer :

To remain the sole source of that But at length I have settled, I hope,

murderous measure. all these clatters,

1 Blackwood's Magazine.

ON

THE

COMPOSITION

OF

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2 Lockhart's novel.

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