THE RISE OF THE DUTCH REPUBLIC.

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206 ページ - The affair of the Anabaptists,' writes Sainte Aldegonde, 'has been renewed. The prince objects to exclude them from citizenship. He answered me sharply that their yea was equal to our oath, and that we should not press this matter, unless we were willing to confess that it was just for the papists to compel us to a divine service which was against our conscience.
509 ページ - All mankind know," said the preamble, "that a prince is appointed by God to cherish his subjects, even as a shepherd to guard his sheep. When, therefore, the prince does not fulfil his duty as protector; when he oppresses his subjects, destroys their ancient liberties, and treats them as slaves, he is to be considered, not a prince, but a tyrant. As such, the estates of the land may lawfully and reasonably depose him, and elect another in his room.
618 ページ - He was, besides, largely indebted to every one of his powerful relatives : so that the payment of the encumbrances upon his estate very nearly justified the fears of his children. While on the one hand, therefore, he poured out these enormous sums like water, and firmly refused a hearing to the tempting offers of the royal government, upon the other hand he...
620 ページ - Emperor could only crush without controlling, was ever responsive to the master-hand of Orange. His presence scared away Imbize and his bat-like crew, confounded the schemes of John Casimir, frustrated the wiles of Prince Chimay, and while he lived, Ghent was what it ought always to have remained, the bulwark, as it had been the cradle, of popular liberty. After his death it became its tomb. Ghent, saved thrice by the policy, the eloquence, the self-sacrifices of Orange, fell within three months...
618 ページ - He was besides largely indebted to every one of his powerful relatives, so that the payment of the incumbrances upon his estate very nearly justified the fears of his children. While on the one hand, therefore, he poured out these enormous sums like water, and firmly refused a hearing to the tempting offers of the royal government, upon the other hand he proved the disinterested nature of his services by declining, year after year, the sovereignty over the provinces; and by only accepting, in the...
627 ページ - He went through life bearing the load of a people's sorrows upon his shoulders with a smiling face. Their name was the last word upon his lips, save the simple affirmative, with which the soldier who' had been battling for the right all his lifetime, commended his soul in dying '' to his great captain, Christ" The people were grateful and affectionate, for they trusted the character of their "Father William...
113 ページ - Six millions, at least, had thus been swallowed ; a destruction by which no one had profited. There was, however, much left The strong boxes of the merchants, the gold, silver, and precious jewelry, the velvets, satins, brocades, laces, and similar well concentrated and portable plunder, were rapidly appropriated. So far the course was plain and easy, but in private houses it was more difficult The cash, plate, and other valuables of individuals were not so easily discovered. Torture was, therefore,...
111 ページ - Women, children, old men, were killed in countless numbers, and still, through all this havoc, directly over the heads of the struggling throng, suspended in mid-air above the din and smoke of the conflict, there sounded, every half-quarter of every hour, as if in gentle mockery, from the belfry of the cathedral, the tender and melodious chimes.
111 ページ - Town-house to the quays were all one vast conflagration. On the other side, the magnificent cathedral, separated from the Grande Place by a single row of buildings, was lighted up, but not attacked, by the flames. The tall spire cast its gigantic shadow across the last desperate conflict. In the street called the Canal uu Sucre, immediately behind the Town-house, there was a fierce struggle, a horrible massacre.
620 ページ - Frisian races with the subtiler, more delicate, and more graceful national elements in which the genius of the Frank, the Roman, and the Romanized Celt were so intimately blended ! As long as the father of the country lived, such a union was possible. His power of managing men was so unquestionable that there was always a hope even in the darkest hour, for men felt implicit reliance as well on his intellectual resources as on his integrity. This power of dealing with his fellow-men he mani- 9 fested...

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