The Works of William Shakespeare: A glossary to Shakespeare

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Chapman and Hall, 1867

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372 ページ - The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
235 ページ - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
273 ページ - And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
183 ページ - Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed, I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal, For it must seem their guilt.
14 ページ - I seem to remember having been told that a bad sweep was once left in a stack with his brush, to indicate which way the wind blew.
28 ページ - A kind of embroidered mantle, which hung down from the middle to about the knees, or lower, worn by knights on horseback.
64 ページ - The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye, As the perfumed tincture of the roses ; Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses ; But, for their virtue* only is their show, They live unwoo'd, and unrespected fade ; Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so ; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made : And so of you, beauteous and lovely youth, When that shall fade, my verse distils your truth.
200 ページ - Millions of yeares this old drivell Cupid lives ; While still more wretch, more wicked he doth prove : Till now at length that Jove an office gives, (At Juno's suite who much did Argus love) In this our world a Hangman for to be Of all those fooles that will have all they see.
159 ページ - The ancients, who often paid more attention to received opinions than to the evidence of their senses, believed that fern bore no seed. Our ancestors imagined that this plant produced seed which was invisible. Hence, from an extraordinary mode of reasoning, founded on the fantastic doctrine of signatures, they concluded that they who possessed the secret of wearing this seed about them would become invisible.
363 ページ - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft, In the Rialto, you have rated me About my moneys and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug ; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe : You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own'.

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