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THE NIGHT-BLOWING STOCK.

COME! look at this plant, with its narrow pale leaves,

And its tall, slim, delicate stem, Thinly studded with flowers-yes, with flowers-there they are, Don't you see, at each joint there's a little brown star?

But in truth, there's no beauty in them.”

“So, you ask, why I keep it, the little mean thing!

Why I stick it up here just in sight? 'Tis a fancy of mine.”. L" A strange fancy !" you say, “No accounting for tastes—In this instance you may,

For the flower-but I'll tell you to-night..

“ Some six hours hence, when the Lady Moon

Looks down on that bastion'd wall, When the twinkling stars dance silently On the rippling surface of the sea,

And the heavy night dews fall,

“ Then meet me again in this casement niche,

On the spot where we're standing now,
Nay, question not wherefore-perhaps with me
To look out on the night, and the bright broad sea,

And to hear its majestic flow."

“ Well, we're met here again ; and the moonlight sleeps

On the sea and the bastion'd wall ;
And the flowers there below-how the night wind brings
Their delicious breath on its dewy wings!”
“ But there's one,” say you,

sweeter than all !"

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“ Which is it? the myrtle or jessamine,

Or their sovereign lady, the rose ?
Or the heliotrope, or the virgin's bower?
What! neither!"_" Oh no, 'tis some other flower,

Far sweeter than either of those.”

“ Far sweeter! and where, think you, groweth the plant

That exhaleth such perfume rare?" “ Look about, up and down, but take care, or you'll break With your elbow that poor little thing that's so weak.”

“ Why, 'tis that smells so sweet, I declare !”

“ Ah ha! is it that ?-have you found out now

Why I cherish that odd little fright?
All is not gold that glitters, you know;
And it is not all worth makes the greatest show,

In the glare of the strongest light.
“There are human flowers, full many, I trow,

As unlovely as that by your side, That a common observer passeth by, With a scornful lip, and a careless eye,

In the hey-day of pleasure and pride.

“ But move one of those to some quiet spot,

From the mid-day sun's broad glare,
Where domestic peace broods with dove-like wing,
And try if the homely, despised thing,

May not yield sweet fragrance there.
« Or wait till the days of trial come,

The dark days of trouble and woe,
When they shrink and shut up, late so bright in the sun ;
Then turn to the little despised one,

And see if 'twill serve you so.
“ And judge not again at a single glance,

Nor pass sentence hastily.
There are many good things in this world of ours;
Many sweet things, and rare-weeds that prove precious flowers,
Little dreamt of by you or me."

c. C. has a trifling complaint on the score of inaccuracy to make against the Compositor who set " Gracious Rain.” An alteration in the tense of a verb, at the beginning, which threw the rest of the poem into bad grammar ; and the alteration of “ upfurled" into “ unfurled,” in another part, reversing the sense of the stanza in which that word occurred.

THE MAN-OF-WAR'S MAN.

CHAP. III.
The scrapers and the holy stones have now been keenly plied,

And the painters, jolly dogs, have done their duty;
And now she breasts, so smart and gay, the rippling, roaring tide,

With masts on end, and rigging black'd, a beauty !
Her ports unshipt, her carronades run out on every side ;

She looks so like a sturdy fail-me-never,
That, dn me, if I don't, and I'll do it too with pride,

Drink, “ Huzza ! the saucy Tottumfog forever!" EDWARD had now, according to the and other stores, whether for the gunmost correct guardship phraseology, ner, boatswain, or carpenter. Provigot " a ship of his own,” being at sions and water followed; the riggers length regularly enrolled on a vessel's were busy getting the rigging over the books; and he had soon to experience mast-heads; all hands were on the the mighty difference of labour that stretch while day-light lasted ; nor was exists between the lazy-lagging regu- it until the painters began their de lar-timed motions of a guardo, and the corations, that her lively ship’s comunremitting and lively activity exert- pany had the smallest breathing from ed on board a vessel of war preparing the hardest and most fatiguing toil. for sea.

All this strife of work arose from al The launch of the Namur had no circumstance by no means uncommon sooner delivered over her live cargo to among naval commanders. While rethe first lieutenant of the Tottumfog, fitting their vessels at any station, they than he instantly ordered them to come necessarily under the command stow their luggage in midships on the of the Port-Admiral of the place; booms, and immediately set them to who, from the frequency of his signals work in scraping the pitch from the for the attendance of the captain, or vessel's decks and sides, outside and in, various other minor officers, is very with which the caulkers had so liber- often troublesome enough; thus not ally bedaubed her. This done, seve- only keeping the commanders contiral days were next spent in getting in nually upon the alert, but contining and stoving her water-casks, her guns, them on board during his official shot, and other warlike apparatus, to- hours, in case their attendance should gether with cables, sails, spare rigging, be required. This, however rigor

THE NIGHT-BLOWING STOCK.

Come ! look at this plant, with its narrow pale leaves,

And its tall, slim, delicate stem, Thinly studded with flowers-yes, with flowers—there they are, Don't you see, at each joint there's a little brown star?

But in truth, there's no beauty in them."

So, you ask, why I keep it, the little mean thing!

Why I stick it up here just in sight? 'Tis a fancy of mine."- A strange fancy!” you say, “No accounting for tastes-In this instance you may,

For the flower-but I'll tell you to-night..

“ Some six hours hence, when the Lady Moon

Looks down on that bastion’d wall, When the twinkling stars dance silently On the rippling surface of the sea,

And the heavy night dews fall,

“ Then meet me again in this casement niche,

On the spot where we're standing now,
Nay, question not wherefore-perhaps with me
To look out on the night, and the bright broad sea,

And to hear its majestic flow.”

“ Well, we're met here again ; and the moonlight sleeps

On the sea and the bastion'd wall;
And the flowers there below-how the night wind brings
Their delicious breath on its dewy wings!

“ But there's one,” say you, “sweeter than all!"

" Which is it? the myrtle or jessamine,

Or their sovereign lady, the rose ?
Or the heliotrope, or the virgin's bower?
What! neither!"_" Oh no, 'tis some other flower,

Far sweeter than either of those.”

“ Far sweeter! and where, think you, groweth the plant

That exhaleth such perfume rare ?" “ Look about, up and down, but take care, or you'll break With your elbow that poor little thing that's so weak.”

“ Why, 'tis that smells so sweet, I declare !"

« Ah ha! is it that ?-have you found out now

Why I cherish that odd little fright?
All is not gold that glitters, you know;
And it is not all worth makes the greatest show,

In the glare of the strongest light.

“There are human flowers, full many, I trow,

As unlovely as that by your side, That a common observer passeth by, With a scornful lip, and a careless eye,

In the hey-day of pleasure and pride.

“ But move one of those to some quiet spot,

From the mid-day sun's broad glare,
Where domestic peace broods with dove-like wing,
And try if the homely, despised thing,

May not yield sweet fragrance there.
“ Or wait till the days of trial come,

The dark days of trouble and woe,
When they shrink and shut up, late so bright in the sun ;
Then turn to the little despised one,

And see if 'twill serve you so.
“ And judge not again at a single glance,

Nor pass sentence hastily.
There are many good things in this world of ours;
Many sweet things, and rare-weeds that prove precious flowers,
Little dreamt of by you or me."

C. C. has a trifling complaint on the score of inaccuracy to make against the Compositor who set " Gracious Rain.” An alteration in the tense of a verb, at the beginning, which threw the rest of the poem into bad grammar ; and the alteration of " upfurled” into “ unfurled,” in another part, reversing the sense of the stanza in which that word occurred.

THE MAN-OF-WAR'S MAN.

CHAP. III.
The scrapers and the holy stones have now been keenly plied,

And the painters, jolly dogs, have done their duty;
And now she breasts, so smart and gay, the rippling, roaring tide,

With masts on end, and rigging black'd, a beauty !
Her ports unshipt, her carronades run out on every side;

She looks so like a sturdy fail-me-never,
That, dan me, if I don't, and I'll do it too with pride,

Drink, “ Huzza! the saucy Tottumfog forever!”

Edward had now, according to the and other stores, whether for the gunmost correct guardship phraseology, ner, boatswain, or carpenter. Provigot " a ship of his own," being at sions and water followed ; the riggers length regularly enrolled on a vessel's were busy getting the rigging over the books; and he had soon to experience mast-heads; all hands were on the the mighty difference of labour that stretch while day-light lasted ; nor was exists between the lazy-lagging regu- it until the painters began their delar-timed motions of a guardo, and the corations, that her lively ship's comunremitting and lively activity exert- pany had the smallest breathing from ed on board a vessel of war preparing the hardest and most fatiguing toil. for sea.

All this strife of work arose from a The launch of the Namur had no circumstance by no means uncommon sooner delivered over her live cargo to among naval commanders. While rethe first lieutenant of the Tottumfog, fitting their vessels at any station, they than he instantly ordered them to come necessarily under the command stow their luggage in midships on the of the Port-Admiral of the place; booms, and immediately set them to who, from the frequency of his signals work in scraping the pitch from the for the attendance of the captain, or vessel's decks and sides, outside and in, various other minor officers, is very with which the caulkers had so liber- often troublesome enough; thus not ally bedaubed her. This done, seve- only keeping the commanders-contiral days were next spent in getting in nually upon the alert, but confining and stowing her water-casks, her guns, them on board during his official shot, and other warlike apparatus, to hours, in case their attendance should gether with cables, sails, spare rigging, be required. This, however rigore ously they may enforce discipline in ropes, which the top-men bay hold of, their own vessels, as it partially infrin- and by dragging the stone to and from ges on their personal freedom, is al- one another, in the manner of a saw, on ways deemed a grievance highly irk- the sanded deck, they thereby give it some and disagreeable; and if they a smoothness and a whiteness which can, by dint of a little overstrained the most zealous scrubbing could neexertion, escape to sea, from this un- ver accomplish. Small hand-stones popular etiquette, a day or two sooner, are used for those corners which the the task is always enforced with the large ones cannot act upon; and, as in most unrelenting rigour.

using them, a poor wight must get A short time, therefore, saw the down on his bare marrow-bones, amid Tottumfog's masts on end ready for the wet and filth, they have long been sea, and a few days more brought her known by the cant name of Bibles, sailing orders, by which her ship's a term which, by the bye, we would company heard, greatly to the satis- remark en passant, is rather inauspicifaction of our hero, that her destina- ous to the high hopes of those very tion was the North Sea, with her zealous and respectable individuals head-quarters at Leith Roads. who augur so much good from a pro

The day previous to sailing was ex- fuse distribution of the Sacred Volume pected by all to be one of great cere- throughout the fleet, since every thomony, which, in the version of the na- rough-bred man-of-war's man must vy, is another name for one ushered in naturally attach to the latter a large by excessive hard work; for it seems, portion of that wicked wit, and thowhispers had escaped from that grand rough contempt, which he invariably focus of internal politics, the captain's feels for the former. The decks besteward's cabin, that his worship was ing therefore well holy-stoned, are to be early on board—the clerk of the once more rinced with a profusion of cheque meaning to muster the ship's buckets of water, to carry off the sand, company. Accordingly, shortly after then carefully dried up with swabs, day-break, they were roused by the and the work is completed. boatswain and his mates piping All As soon as the decks were finished, kands ahoy! Having turned out, and and top-gallant yards sent aloft, the resigned their hammocks to the cap- yards were carefully squared, the foretains of the tops, who were vying with top-sail let go, a gun was fired, and each other in their neatness of stow- blue Peter hoisted—the usual signal age, the holy-stones were produced, for sailing ; all which being accomand to it they went, a-polishing the plished, the first Lieutenant now ordecks for a series of hours. As some dered all hands to clean themselves, of our readers may not entirely com- and the breakfast to be piped. prehend the meaning of this phrase, a At two bells, (nine o'clock) the few words of explanation may not be boatswain's pipe announced the arriunacceptable. These stones have ac- val of the Captain; and Edward, eager quired the term holy, we believe, from to behold his future commander, hurthe circumstance of their being used ried on deck. From the very first in almost every vessel of war at least good look he got of him, however, he once a-week--that selected morning disliked him; and it must be confessbeing generally Sunday ; when a good ed, that even his best friends acknowdeal of extra scrubbing is gone through, ledged, that Captain Switchem's apprevious to the word being passed for pearance was by no means prepossessall hands to clean and dress themselves ing. He was a tall, meagre man, apfor muster and prayers. The manner parently about forty years of age-of of using them, again, is simply this :- a grave, and rather severe cast of counThe decks being first well rinced with tenance, whose whole figure bore all water drawn from the sides, and the external marks of severe exbauspretty liberally sprinkled over with tion, from a tropical climate. Yet, sand, the holy-stones are next brought though his form had an emaciated apforward, and are large flat stones, pearance, and his features came under from 112 to 130 pounds weight-of a the description of cadaverous, he had soft, smooth bottom, with two iron a strong, keen eye, and a custom of rings sunk into their upper surface, shewing, in his rapid way of speaking, from which are appended two hand- a finely-formed, excellent set of teeth,

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