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be accepted by a discerning public, as a full acquittal of the claims of his inperious, intriguing, and talented wife. About two years before her death this remarkable woman published, her own Vindication un. der the title of • An Account of the Conduct of the Dowager Duchess of Marlborough, from her first coming to Court, to the year 1710, which excessively galled many of her enemies, both personal and political, and elicited several acrimonious replies. The book was revised by the historian Hook—and lost in consequence much of the characteristic features of her ladyship’s style; yet it is replete with ability, carrying a conviction of the sincerity of the authoress, and unfolding the motives by which she was actuated, with force and clearness.' A concise and meagre biography of the duchess, probably ordered and paid for by her,' was subsequently issued in 1745, and to these two works we have hitherto been restricted, for our knowledge of the character and history of the ablest and most remarkable woman of her age.

Mrs. Thomson has undertaken to supply what was yet wanted to complete the picture of the proud duchess, at once the subject and the mistress of Queen Anne, and no candid reader will close her volumes without a grateful appreciation of her labors. She has spared no pains to gather up every scrap of information yet existing, and has happily succeeded in setting the intrigues and fluctuations which marked the career of her heroine in a clearer light than had previously been done. The life of the duchess of Marlborough is so interwoven with the politics of William III. and of Anne's reigns, that we must know much of the latter in order duly to understand the former. The main object of the work, however, is 'to develop private history, connecting it by general remarks, with the leading events of the day.' It is in this point of view that the volumes before us are chiefly interesting, and their value would have been increased if the style had been somewhat more condensed and spirited.

The New Excitement ; or a Book to induce Young People to Read.

For 1840. Containing Remarkable Appearances in Nature, Signal Preservations, and Such Incidents as are Particularly Fitted to Assist the Youthful Mind. By the Editor of · The New Excitement' for 1838 and 1839, and of · The Excitement’ for the Preceding years. Edinburgh: W. Innes.

The name of the estimable editor of this little volume will serve as a sufficient introduction of it to the confidence of our readers. Designed to furnish innocent and amusing reading for young people,' it is miscellaneous in its contents, yet carefully guarded against the infusion of any sentiment tending to lower the tone or impair the force of moral principle. The incidents recorded are, in many cases, instructive as well as interesting, and the whole volume is happily adapted to rouse the slothful mind, and to induce a taste for reading where it had not previously existed. To the juvenile members of our own family it is the most welcome visitor we can introduce.

Government of Canada. Debates of the House of Commons in the

Year 1774, on the Bill for Making more Effectual Provision for the Government of Quebec. Drawn up from the Notes of the Right Hon. Sir Henry Cavendish, Bart., Member of Lostwithiel ; now first published by J. Wright. With a Map of Canada, copied from the Second Edition of Mitchell's Map of North America, referred to in the Debates. 8vo. pp. 303. London: Ridgway.

An invaluable addition to the parliamentary history of our country, which ought to be in the hands of every person who is interested in the discussions now afloat respecting Canada. •Two generations have passed away, and yet the debates (recorded in this volume) might be conceived to be those of yesterday ;-so completely are the circumstances of the country brought round by time to the point from which they first started. It has long been matter of regret, that the proceedings of the Commons in the 13th parliament of Great Britain, commencing in May, 1768, and ending in June, 1774, should, in consequence of the strict exclusion of strangers from the house, have remained nearly a blank in our history. We rejoice to learn that Mr. Wright, guided by a curious passage in Almon's Biographical Anecdotes,' has at length succeeded in discovering amongst the Egerton Manuscripts, a voluminous report of the debates of this period, drawn up by Sir Henry Cavendish, one of the members of the house. The volume before us is a specimen, which is to be followed up by the publication of the whole in four or five volumes, if sufficient encouragement be obtained. There cannot surely be any doubt on this point, for a more valuable addition to our historical literature can scarcely be imagined. It would be disgraceful in the last degree if such an undertaking should not prove eminently successful. From the specimen which this volume furnishes we have no hesitation in declaring our conviction, that by the projected publication, a fuller and more life-like report will be obtained of the proceedings of this parliament, than is possessed of the debates of any other prior to the relaxation of the standing order of the house.

A Praxis on the Latin Potential and Subjunctive Moods, being an

Attempt to Illustrate their Nature and Construction in the way of Exercise. By the Rev. Robert Maclure, LL.D. London: John Mortimer. 1839.

This is in some respects a judicious arrangement of the various uses of the subjunctive mood, but it is deformed by the obsolete and absurd theory of a potential mood distinct from the subjunctive. When even in Greek the best grammarians are agreed in regarding what are called the subjunctive and optative moods as in reality one mood, (the one being the conjunctive of the principal tenses, and the other the conjunctive of the historical tenses,) it is too late in the day to revive the useless figment of a Latin potential mood. VOL. VI.

U U

The Autobiography of Thomas Platter, a Schoolmaster of the Sir.

teenth Century. Translated from the German. By the Translator of Lavater's Original Maxims. London: Wertheim. 1839.

This is an interesting biography of a singular man in an extraordinary period. It is a practical and vivid exemplification of the determined pursuit of knowledge under the pressure of difficulties, and will be read with great pleasure. It gives a view of one side, and a very curious side, of society in the sixteenth century. The book is illustrated with wood-cuts.

1. The French Master for the Nursery : or Early Lessons in French

By M. Lepage, Professor of the French Language in London. 2. Lepage's French Sehool. Part I. L'Echo de Paris. 3. Lepage's French School. Part II. Gift of Conversation. London :

Effingham Wilson. 1839.

The above works are intended to form a complete French course ; and any one who will go through them as the author recommends mar make himself master of the language. But unfortunately the difficulty is not in finding good books for teaching French, but in getting them worked through with perseverance. It is mere empiricism to talk of acquiring any language thoroughly (and if not acquired thoroughly it is not acquired at all) in a short time. A smaltering of a dozen languages may be got in a few weeks ; but to learn any one well is a work of time, and of a long time too. What is wanted is the resolution to go regularly through some course.

Supplementary Notes to the Third Edition of The Law of Christ

Respecting Civil Obedience, especially in the Payment of Tribute. By John Brown, D.D. 8vo. pp. 123. London: Ball, Arnold, and Co.

On looking over the third edition of his volume On the Law of Christ,' &c., Dr. Brown informs us, that ‘various remarks occurred, and a number of passages, I had overlooked, or had met with in the course of subsequent reading, suggested themselves to me, as fitted to throw additional light on the important topics treated in the work.' These were noted for future use, in the event of another edition being required, but were ultimately found to be so numerous and important, that he resolved on immediately printing them as a Supplement.' In the propriety of this resolution we fully concur,-our only fear is that in this day of light and hasty reading, few will be disposed to ex. amine with sufficient diligence the invaluable materials with which he has supplied them. We counsel all our readers to do so, and feel confident of their thanks should they take our advice. The various reading and discriminating judgment of the esteemed author are sig. nally conspicuous throughout his excerpts.

Scripture Illustrations ; being a Series of Engravings on Steel and

Wood, Illustrative of the Geography and Topography of the Bible, and Demonstrating the Truth of the Scriptures from the face of Nature and the Remains of the Works of Man, with Explanations and Remarks. By the Rev. J. A. La Trobe, M.A. Quarto. London: L. and G. Seeley.

The character of this publication will be best explained by an extract from the brief Introduction which is prefixed to it.

• The following series of engravings,' remarks Mr. La Trobe, illustrative of Scripture scenes, has been chiefly selected from works of acknowledged worth and fidelity. The travels of Ainslie, Buckingham, Ferbin, Le Brun, Niebuhr, Parsons, Sir R. K. Porter, Wittman, and others, are the sources whence they have been for the most part derived. The author of the accompanying letter-press has no claim to the merit of the selection, as it had been made long before it was referred to his notice. His object, in his particular department, has been to blend instruction with pleasant reading-to avoid fanciful descriptions on the one hand, and dry skeleton statements on the other. It has been his aim also, when opportunity permitted, “to speak a word in season,' that the spirit might be refreshed, as well as the understanding profited.'

The Religion of Protestants a Safe Way to Salvation. By William

Chillingworth, M.A. Two vols. London: The Religious Tract Society.

A neat and cheap edition, without alteration or abridgment, of the most masterly defence of Protestantism in our language. The Young Man from Home. By John Angell James. London:

The Religious Tract Society

An excellent companion and most judicious adviser, which we heartily recommend to the confidence of every youth, and especially of those who are quitting the parental roof. Geography of the Bible : or Some Account of the Countries and

Places mentioned in Holy Scripture. London : The Religious Tract Society.

Another of those useful little volumes by the publication of which the Tract Society is so admirably fulfilling its vocation. It is mainly a reprint of a small work issued a few years since by the Rev. Messrs. Alexander, of Princeton, in North America, and entitled 'A Geography of the Bible.' Numerous additions and some corrections have been made with a view of rendering it more complete and instructive. The Convalescent. Twelve Letters on Recovery from Sickness. By

Mrs. Gilbert. London: Jackson and Walford.
The tenderness of maternal love blended with a tone of deep Chris-

The Autobiography of Thomas Platter, a Schoolmaster of the Sir

teenth Century. Translated from the German. By the Translator of Lavater's Original Maxims. London: Wertheim. 1839.

This is an interesting biography of a singular man in an extraordinary period. It is a practical and vivid exemplification of the determined pursuit of knowledge under the pressure of difficulties, and will be read with great pleasure. It gives a view of one side, and a very curious side, of society in the sixteenth century. The book is illustrated with wood-cuts.

1. The French Master for the Nursery: or Early Lessons in French

By M. Lepage, Professor of the French Language in London. 2. Lepage's French School. Part I. L'Echo de Paris. 3. Lepage's French School. Part II. Gift of Conversation. London:

Effingham Wilson. 1839.

The above works are intended to form a complete French course ; and any one who will go through them as the author recommends may make himself master of the language. But unfortunately the difficulty is not in finding good books for teaching French, but in getting them worked through with perseverance. It is mere empiricism to talk of acquiring any language thoroughly (and if not acquired thoroughly it is not acquired at all) in a short time. A smattering of a dozen languages may be got in a few weeks ; but to learn any one well is a work of time, and of a long time too. What is wanted is the resolution to go regularly through some course.

Supplementary Notes to the Third Edition of the Law of Christ

Respecting Civil Obedience, especially in the Payment of Tribute.' By John Brown, D.D. 8vo. pp. 123. London: Ball, Arnold, and Co.

On looking over the third edition of his volume ‘On the Law of Christ,' &c., Dr. Brown informs us, that 'various remarks occurred, and a number of passages, I had overlooked, or had met with in the course of subsequent reading, suggested themselves to me, as fitted to throw additional light on the important topics treated in the work.' These were noted for future use, in the event of another edition being required, but were ultimately found to be so numerous and important, that he resolved on immediately printing them as a Supplement. In the propriety of this resolution we fully concur, our only fear is that in this day of light and hasty reading, few will be disposed to ex. amine with sufficient diligence the invaluable materials with which he has supplied them. We counsel all our readers to do so, and feel confident of their thanks should they take our advice. The various reading and discriminating judgment of the esteemed author are signally conspicuous throughout his excerpts.

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