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CHAPTER XV.-SISTER V. SWEETHEART.

part?

There had not been, so far as I I passed a very anxious and could recollect, anything that could uncomfortable time, endeavouring be called even a tiff — if such a vainly to turn my whole attention wretched syllable can find its way to the doings and the interests of into the heaven seventy-seventh- other people, who certainly had a between the lovely Dariel and my strong claim upon me; but still a self; but on the other hand I had certain feeling would arise in my left her rather more abruptly than kindest and largest moments, that courtesy would warrant, because of it was scarcely just on my part to the grievous tranquillity she dis- neglect with such severity my entire played in speaking of a fellow (a duty to myself. Who was farmer Prince Hafer, as she called him), Bandilow, who was Lord Melladew, who possessed almost every hateful Jackson Stoneman, or even sister merit, and was eager to bring it in, Grace, that I should have no one to to cut out mine, by some underhand think about but them? Let the and undermining fraud. What had whole parish, and the county too, I done to be treated like this? Was rush into the Union, and break there no claim established on my stones, or be stone-broken, by

Was it nothing to have means of this new crack; but come down the hill that evening, love is immortal, Love is Lord of at the risk of my neck and old all; what had I done to make Joe's as well, and then to put up him hold his blessed tongue like with a strained conscience for a this? month, and then to catch no fish I strode about, and strove about, every day, for it might be a week and let everybody know that when of hook and barb, and then to run I was put upon I could stand up a frightful risk of hydrophobia, and against it; and my dear sister then to let my duty and the busi- Grace, who had ideas of her own, ness of the farm- however there such as I had spoiled her into when was not much to be said about she was my childhood's pet, was bethat; but what had I done that no ginning to smell—oh vile metaphor! message came, that I should be left

a rat; because I would not always to cool my heels, without even a do exactly what she wanted, and distant sigh in token of some little once I had the courage to tell her anxiety about me?

that there were other girls in the “ Send Allai to me to-morrow world besides Grace Cranleigh. night," I had said as plainly as Her state of mind at this was possible, “and you shall hear all enough to prove to mine, that the about young Nickols." It was no great truth thus pronounced was a young Nickols—that was my mis- good one for the world; and I ventake, or my jealousy had rejuvenised tured, with some tenderness, to inhim; but that could not alter the timate as much. But how much intention.

better for me, as for every man so Was it to be supposed that placed, if, instead of using tongue, Dariel, the gentle, and sensible, I had plunged both hands into my and simple - hearted Dariel, had pockets-a proceeding which puzzles taken offence at my hasty depar- and checkmates the female race, beture, and resolved to have no more cause they cannot gracefully do the to say to me?

like-and then had walked off with I am

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a whistle, which adds pari ratione pressions about me.

I don't care to their outer insight.

what you say in fun, you know. “Then I am right,” said Grace, But when it comes to serious talk catching her advantage, as a girl —but I dare say she-oh you

could always does, before it is even on the span her with one hand.” hop; "there is some sly girl, with- “My dear sister," I replied, beout the sense of right to come and cause I saw some sign of glistening ask me what I think of it, who has in her bright blue eyes, and knew laid her snares too cleverly for my that it was all up with me, if that dear brother George, my only should come to drops ; "I have brother I might say.

For Harold never told you a falsehood, and I is too far above us in intellect, to be am not likely to begin. Harold counted as one of the family. Oh may have all the intellect of the it is so sad, so sad and cruel to age; but can you say as much as me !"

that of him?" “ Explain yourself,” I answered, She shook her head, and made a hitting by a fluke on the very best face; which enabled me to smile at thing to be said to a girl, because the superiority of his mind. “Well she never knows how to do it. then, I will tell you—there is a And what had Harold done, to little truth in some of your imaginabe set in the sky, like that? tions. Though not at all as you

“You know what I mean well think. Quite the opposite extreme. enough. Too well, George, I can A great deal too good for me, too see it in your face. Now can you perfect, too lofty, too beautiful, in look at me in your solid old way, every way too angelic.” as I have every right to demand, “ It is quite unnecessary to tell for even you will own that, and me that ;" Grace might have shown assure me on your honour that I am more refined feeling than this. altogether wrong? That there is

That there is “But one naturally wants to know nobody wanting to come between more about such an example to all us. That I am still number one- humanity." 'Al' you used to call me; but No doubt. But you must curb that sounds like slang; and I don't your curiosity, my dear; and imitaunderstand the sea. Am I number tion on your part would be hopeone still, George ?”

less. You have got all this out “Let every tub stand upon its of me by much perseverance ; that own bottom.” I was not taken implies patience, which you will altogether by surprise, as she in- have to exercise." tended; for I had expected this for “Now can you suppose for one a long time, knowing how sharp moment, George, in spite of all our Grace was. I could scarcely your self-confidence, that I would have said a more appropriate thing; put up with such a thing as this ? for my sister had her stiff linen That an abstract idea of some diapron on, bustling about with it, as vinity is to be my entire knowledge she did in the mornings, to attend of my brother's choice ?" to the dairy and the poultry, and

“I wish it could be otherwise, all that. And being of a noble my dear child," I replied, with a English figure, she had not pulled warmth that should have satisfied her waist in, as she found it her her ; “just for the present it must duty to do at one o'clock.

The whole thing is very "I am not a tub, George. It is strange, and complicated with very unkind of you to use such ex- many things most unusual.

be so.

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not a free agent, as the lawyers where it should have been, which say; if a mysterious thing of some happened to be very near my heart, importance comes to my knowledge there she laid her fingers trembling, confidentially, am I to pour it forth and began to reproach herself into every body? You would be the

stead of me. very last, I am quite sure, to “None of that !" I said, with tempt me to anything dishonour- the powers of logic coming to my able.”

aid ; although I defy any father, I looked at her impressively, grandfather, or uncle to have so and felt certain that such an appeal got out of it. “Everybody knows must silence her. She thought a how good you are.

Well, well, do little while, and then looked at anything you like with me." me; and some flicker of a smile, “ Now if it had only been somewhich I could not altogether help, body else, somebody who never set her off again, as if I were only can know everything about you, as talking humbug.

your favourite sister does, would “You called me a tub just now; you have called her a humbug,

s and this perfect and wonderful George—to use one of your own creature that lives in the clouds is sweet expressions? Or would you superior to all the Angels, but have said, 'Yes, you have a right to even a star may look down into a know, you ought to know everytub, as they showed us the eclipse thing about my affairs. I should last summer. On the other hand be unworthy of the name of man, the tub may look up at the star; if I kept any secrets from you, my but George, can it talk about the dear.' And then what a help you star? Come, that is a very sound would have, as soon as everargument now. You can't get out “ As soon as ever I had told her of that, do what you will. You all about myself! How you do are bound to tell me everything, mix up things ! But this curiosity

, darling George, by the force of of yours is useless. I am compelled your own reasoning.”

to maintain strict silence, until cerNo other relative but a brother tain important events have taken could have held out against such place. Until-" coaxing ways. She came, and sat “Why, it must be at least a upon my knee, and touched me Princess !” Grace exclaimed, jumpwith a run-away glance (as a child ing up, and clapping her hands, does to a child, before any cares and then walking, as if she had a come between them), and then ten-yard train behind her; "we brought the hollow of her temple must all be kept waiting, until the into mine, as if to say — “how impending vacancy of the throne could I run away from you?” occurs." And then, with the freshness of her “Exactly so," I answered, for sweet hair falling round me (which after that bit of impudence, and brought into my mind at once our her look of contempt at the ceiling, joyful romps together), she knew a she deserved to be driven to Bedgreat deal better than to visit me lam by the goads of curiosity; with sentimental lips, though they “how clever of you ! There is a were quivering for what throne in question, and one of the cares to kiss his sister, except upon most ancient in the world. Well, her forehead? But she, being up I never should have thought you to all devices, found I had a but- could hit the mark like that!” ton off; and in the very place "I won't ask another thing. I

VOL. CLXI.—NO. DCCCCLXXV.

man

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would not hear it, if you told me. but with a popgun over her shoulNo, no, not for Joe!” Oh what der. would Tom Erricker have thought, " Alas that we should have to if he had heard the dignified Grace watch my dear brother! He is so thus indulging in slang? “I am good and soft — they will be sure not going to have my head chopped to take him in." off, for prying into State - secrets. At this I was exceedingly anWho is the Prime - minister? He

He noyed. So much so, that if dignity was to have taken Elfrida into sup- and triumphant reason had allowed, per, the other night, but he didn't. I would even have called her back Still I can apply to him, not to at once, and challenged her to exhave my head chopped off. George plain her words; which (as I said don't attempt to tell me anything before) is the last thing they can more. Self-preservation is Heaven's do. However, upon second thoughts first law. But I don't see how this I found it wiser to leave her to parish will be large enough for us. herself, which would be a miserable Ha! I see it now. How very stupid self; when reflection, which is a of me, that is what the Earl or liquid operation with every true Melladew is come for. Closeted- woman, should have set her is not that the right expression - straight again.

?closeted with his Royal Highness, But, thanks be to the Lord, who Prince George Cranleigh, for some

has made us real men, and given hours ! You see

that nothing us power to exert our brains, withescapes me.

But I must be more out pit-pat of the heart to distract cautious,”

them at every pulse! Although I “No hope, sweet child, of put- was not in the calmest mood for ting me into a passion. And if thinking, because I had never had nothing escapes you, why should such a row with Grace before (and you ever ask a question ?” she was a darling soul, whenever

This was enough to floor even a she let her mind come afterwards), girl of the highest abilities, for nevertheless my road was clear nearly half a second; and as they enough before me. "If I am to be seldom give more than that time to watched," thought I, "and everytheir thoughts, a man may almost thing is to be put upon a business calculate upon the skedaddle of his footing, the sooner I assert myself sister, unless she has at him again the better. I have talked rather within that period. Not so with big perhaps, because she provoked his wife ; she will stick to her guns, me, and I am bound to have somehaving bigger ones, and knowing thing to show for it. I will strike how to work them. Grace ske- a stroke at once. I will go and daddled, as consistency required; see my Princess."

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THE

REGISTRATION

OF

WOMEN

TEACHERS.

The defunct Education Bill Senates of the Universities of called forth an expression of op- Durham, London, and Wales, and inion from all sorts and condi- the Council of the Victoria Unitions of men and

wonien,

from versity ; two persons elected by the educational expert as well as the registered teachers engaged from the man in the street. The otherwise than in public elemenstrongest search-light of discussion tary schools, two elected by the illuminated its every part. Mean registered teachers employed in while, the less attractive and appar- public elementary schools, and two ently less controversial Bill for the elected by the registered teachers Registration of Teachers that mod- generally. As the council will estly followed in the wake of the necessarily be elected before the great measure was almost entirely formation of the register, no elecdisregarded. There is every likeli. tions to the first council can be hood that the Registration Bill made by registered teachers. To will, when it is reintroduced, re- meet that difficulty, it is proposed ceive scanty consideration in the that one person shall be elected by House of Commons, and that it each of the following bodies: the will become a veritable Act of Conference of Head-Masters, the Parliament before any one knows Incorporated Association of Headthe contents of its clauses, or how Masters, the Association of Headit will affect the status of teachers. Mistresses, the College of Pre

Yet, when discussions on educa- ceptors, the Teachers' Guild of tion became last spring the order of Great Britain and Ireland, and the the day, it was borne in on many a

National Union of Teachers. patient listener that the inefficient The conditions of admission to teacher is mainly responsible for the the register are to bedefects in our educational system. (1) A degree or certificate of That proposition is thoroughly general attainments which is sound. Consequently, any meas- granted by some university or ure that, like the Registration Bill, other body recognised for that deals directly with what shall, and purpose by the council; and what shall not, form the necessary (2) A certificate or diploma of qualifications of teachers, demands

adequate knowledge of the most careful consideration on the theory and practice of educapart of the community at large. tion and of practical efficiency

The Registration Bill, in the in teaching which is granted form in which it was drawn last by some university or other session, provides for the establish- body recognised for that purment of a Registration Council pose by the council. consisting of six persons appointed In rare cases the council may, by the Queen, with the advice of with the approval of the Education her Privy Council, one person Departmen, admit to the register elected by each of the fol- a person who cannot produce the lowing bodies: the Hebdomadal qualifications required. A brief Council of the University of Ox- record of qualifications and experiford, the Council of the Senate of ence will be placed after the name the University of Cambridge, the of every teacher on the register.

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