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with the previous parts, concludes the more immediately necessary and useful branches of study to which the attention of the young has usually been directed. I am aware that some of the subjects here submitted, have been regarded by many as more intricate and less useful than the first rudiments of geography and history; and that they have also been found, generally, less inviting to the young mind. I know that a few simple outlines of general geography and detached portions of history, accompanied by maps or pictures, possess more novelty, and consequently greater attractions for youthful minds, than the unvarnished technicalities of grammar, and the sober deductions of arithmetic. But I am by no means persuaded that those are so immediately necessary or essentially useful as these; or that the young mind is prepared to profit by an attention to the former, until it has been expanded and strengthened by an acquaintance with the latter, As this is a subject in regard to which teachers are not perfectly agreed, allow me to offer the opinion of Governor Clinton, to whom the plan of this work was early submitted.

“Full confidence may be reposed in the feasibility of your undertaking, and I presume there will be but one opinion, as to the judicious manner in which you propose to exhibit to the attention of the scholar, the most necessary and useful branches of a common education."

While I express my confidence in the selection of the parts, and the order of their arrangement, it becomes me to acknowledge my deep regret, that, in getting the work through the press, so many errors, seemingly inseparable from a first impression, should have crept into its pages. Aside from those of a purely typographical nature, there are inequalities, disproportions and discrepances which I can dispose of in no better way than to refer them to the diversity of sources from which the compilation has been drawn. Over all these and whatever other imperfections you may discover, either in the plan or its execution, I must entreat you to draw the veil of charity, and to accept my assurances that the effort has been made with a more direct and special reference to your professional aid and the public good, than to any personal considerations that can possibly be involved in the undertaking.

In regard to the practical use of this work, I will merely observe that the division of the whole into convenient parts, was adopted in order that the pupil might be furnished, at a cheap rate, with such portions as should correspond with the measure of his attainments; and the collateral order of the exercises, was designed to enable the teacher, after a judicious classification of his charge, to adjust the amount of daily labour to the ability of each pupil; to keep his aitention properly employed, and to feed his expanding mind with rich and successive portions of useful instruction.

It is supposed the scholar of ordinary capacity will, while engaged in the first part, be able to sustain six perfect recitations each day; and, on on entering the second part, to extend these to eight; to which may be added an exercise in penmanship. It is also supposed that all arithmetical recitations and illustrations, will be performed in class, with chalk upon a black board suspended against the wall of the house. Finally, is supposed that every scholar, at the return of the fourth recitation, will promptly engage, through the whole course, in the exercise of spelling and pronunciation.

It is confidently believed that with this course of studies in the hands of an entire charge of eighty or a hundred pupils, with proper accommodations, a teacher will accomplish more, with less fatigue and turmoil, and to better satisfaction, in one season, than he can possibly accomplish unHer the present system, in a circle of some years.

• That the compilation may meet your approbation and be productive of all the advantages, in aiding your labours, promoting your usefulness, and building up the public weal, that are here fondly anticipated, is the sincere wish of the

AUTHOR.

To the Parents and Guardians of pupils attached to the District Schools. FELLOW CITIZENS:

Authors may write and printers may publish until subjects are exhausted and materials expended; yet, when all is done, it depends upon you. to say that their works shall be read and their tabours rewarded. A reference to this and the previous parts of the “Common School Manualwill be sufficient evidence to you that I have written, and that printers have published my writings. I now present myself before you for a decision:-Shall the Common School Manual lie upon my hands, disppoint my hopes, and aggravate my wants, or shall it, throʻyour assistance, have free circulation, and exert in community the beneficial influences for which it was originally designed, and of which it is deemed abundantly capable.

In forming your reply to this inquiry, I intreat you to divest yourselves of all prejudice; it is the lhe fabled fish of minnow form which arrests the progress of the stoutest ships. Though single and simple, it may retard the bark of knowledge on the vast ocean of time, more than the adverse blast or the dead calm.

Call to mind the extensive and extending variety of different school books which pervade the country and load your shelves; the additional labour and amount of difficulties which they impose upon your teachers;-the turmoil and confusion which they introduce into your schools,--the tax which they successively levy upon vour industry, and the wreck they make, thron, the frequent changes of teachers, books, and modes of instruction, of the best hopes and just expectations of your children,

Reflect for a moment, of what importance it is to them, that, as they advance to manhood, hey acquire a body of knowledge sufficient for all the purposes of free and independent Republicans, destined to act distinguished parts in the busy scenes of publie and private life, and in the advancement of the great interests of their country. In the Common School Manual, I have the pleasure of presenting them, through you, with a course of studies, which, under the direction of competent instructers, will furnish them with this knowledge so far as it can be had from books and systems of education, and al an expense of time and money far short of the sacrifice which is made for the stinted and undije.sted mass which they now receive,

Will it please you to examine this production and judge for yourselves? It is a subject of vast moment to you and to your offspring, and therefore should not be ontrusted to hireling hands.

While I propose its submission to the ordeal of your decision, allow me to apprise you, that, like all other human productions, it has its imperfections. Confident as I am of its great utility in the hands of the teachers and pupils of your common schools, and partial as I may of right be to the ‘heir of my old age,' its faults have not escaped my observation. Many of them however may be corrected and several improvements introduced in a future impression. Upon the whole, as a rough finish from an unkind and shapeless block, I cheerfully resign it to be adjudged with that candour and good faith which you will not fail to exercise. May it answer your expectations, receive your approbation and patronage, and yield the advantages and answer the purposes originally contemplated by the

AUTHOR.

349

War,

on

SPELLING LESSONS.

Page:
Page.

Inflec. sel, pieces. Creation, 393
Easy words, 3 syl. act. 1st, Indians as found by our fa-
vowels short,

thers,

397
act. 2d & 3d,

352

as found by us, 400
vow, long, ac.

The cataracı of Niagara, 402
1st 2d & 3d,

355 The Poison Tree of Java, 405
2 columns, act, Ist,

Inkle and Yarico, 409-412
pow. short, 358-404 Religion,

415-418
• 2 col. act. 2d, 408-432 Peace and War,-Peace, 421
dipthongs, 435

424
act 3d, 439 Passage of the Red Sea, 420-429
act. Ist, vow.

Des, of Herculaneum, 432
long, 442-460

Pompeii,

435
vow. grave, 463 Dialogue, Prince Edward
vow, sharp, 467
and keeper,'

440
dipthongs, 468 Alexander and Thra-
act, ed, vww.

cian robber,

443
long, 471-490 Macduff, Malcom and
vowels broad, 492 Rosse,

4464449
vowels grave and sharp, 493 Sulton and Howard, 453
act. on 3d, 493-497

Ann and her mo-
1 column, 4 syl, act

ther,

457_461
each, 501 Ximenia and mother, 464
2 col., act. 1st, 504-517

Orlando and Jaques,

468
66 act, 2d, 520–571 Gen. George Washington, 472

574–592 Gen. Napoleon Bonaparte, 475

592 Maj. Gen. Nathaniel
" 5 syl. act; 1st

Green,

479 482
and 2d, 596 Brig. Gen. D, Morgan, 486-490
act. 3d, 601-624 Col. William Washington, 493
" 4th, 624-630 Col. Howard,

479
" 6 syl. act. pro

Col. Otho H. Williams, 501
miscuous, 634-639 Col. Henry Lee,

505
words dif, in spel & pro. 645–658 Brig. Gen. Marion,

from the Latin, 662-668 Battle of Bunker Hill, 513-519
from the French, 671-676 Prin. Am, revolution, 521

READING LESSONS. Washington's resignation, 525
Inflections applied to the sim Reply of Congress,

529
ple series, rule 1st, 350 P, Henry's war speech, 532
352 Philips' Washington,

536
353 Objections to independence, 540
Compound series, rule 1st, 356 J. Adams' reply, 544-549

2d, S59 D Webster's Bunker Hill ad. 553
Series of Serieses, rule, 362 " to survivors of the Bun-
Interrogation point, rule, 1st, 365 ker Hill battle,

557
" 2d, 368 C. Sprague's July oration, 562

“ 31, 371 Gen. Lafayette's visits, &c. 566
Exclamation point, rule 1st, 374 J, Q. Adams'ad. Lafayette. 571
Parenthesis, rule,
376 Gen. Lafayette's reply,

575
Remarks on Inflections,

331 Father and sons, on govern.
ment,

580
tences,

386

on county sheriff, 584

" 3d,
66 4th,

509

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Tflections applied to sen-

Page

413
416
419

'483
487

495

503

page.
coroner and judges, 588 Exercises in commission,
county clerk and sur. Discount,
rogate,

592 Barter,
" justices and loan offi. Practical exercises in Barter, 422
cers,
597 Loss and gain,

424-427
"S supervisor and treas. Exercises in loss and gain, 430
urer,

601 Promiscuous exercises, 434436
auctioners and sealers, 606 Single fellowship,

441
town officers, town
Double

444
clerk,
611 Exercises in fellowship,

447
assessors,
612 Duodecimals,

451_459
inspectors and com Allegation, case 1st, 462
missioners,

616
case 2d,

465
collector of taxes,

620
case 3d,

469
commissioner and over-

case 4th,

473
seer of high ways,
621 Practical exercises,

576
Overseer of the poor & school

Single position,

480
commissioners,

625 Double
Inspectors of schools and Practical exercises,
town constables, 630 Permutation,

491
Bence viewer and pound Combination,
master,

635 Promiscuous exercises; 498
Constitutions, &c.

640 Arithmetical progression,
Bunker Hill monument,

646 case 1st,
Warren's address,
650 case 2d,

506
Pilgrim's song,

655 Geometrical progression,
Pilgrim Fathers,
658 case 1st,

510
Hymn to the stars,
663 case 2d,

511
There is no speech, &c.

case 3d,

514
Life passes &c.

668

672 Promiscuous exercises, 515
David's lamentation, 676 Involution,

518
ARITHMETIC. Evolution, (square root,) 522
Simple interest, case 1st, 351 decimals,

526
case 2d, 355 Practical exercises,

530
case 3d, 357 Cube root,

533
or by decimals,

360 General rule for all roots, 537
case 4th, 362 Mensuration, (superficies,) 541
case 5th, 366 Triangles, &c.

546-550
case 6th,
368 Circles, &c.

554-564
case 7th, 371 Solids,

568-577
case 8th,
372 | Globes,

582-590
case 9th.

372 Capacity of vessels, 591-595
on partial payments, 374 Capacity of casks,

599
on accounts current, 377 Tonage of vessels,
Practical exercises,

381 Board measure,
Compound interest, 387 Timber measure,

604
Interest tables,
394 Round Timber,

608
Promiscuous exercises, 397 Heights and distances, 613
Equation of time,
400 Breadth of a river,

617
Exercises, equation, and in Sides of angles,

624
terest,

403-406 Mechanical powers,
Commission, &c,

410 'Practical exercises,

599
603

627-632
637-642

Page.

351 Allegory,

Page,
Geometrical definitions, 647—651 Clearness in the order, &c. 488
Elements on geometry, 655—663 Unity in the order, &c, 491
Geometrical problems, 664 Strength in the order, &c: 495
Trigonometry,
66956

499
Practical exercises, 673 Figures of speech, &c, 503
GRAMMAR.
Metaphor,

507
False syntas, (sentences,)

511
• corrected, rule ist, 354 Simile,

515
2d, 357 Metonymy,

619
3d, 360 Personification,

523
4th, 363 Apostrophe,

527
5th, 366 Hyperbole,

531
6th, 369 Antithesis, vision interroga-
7th, 372
tion,

535
8th, 375 Esclamation, irony, climas, 538
9th, 379 Correct metaphor,

543
10th, 382
allegory,

547
11th, 388
simile,

552
12th, 391
personification,

556
13th, 385
antithesis,

560
14th, 398
hyperbole,

561
15th, 401
vision,

564
16th, 404

interrogation, 565
17th, 406

exclamation, and irony, 570
18th, 411 Rules for the propriety of
19th, 414
speech,

573_-578
20th, 217 Versification,

583
21st, 420 Different poetic measures,

587
220, 422 Trochaic measure,

591-596
23d, 425 lambic measure,

600-605
Additional rules, 24th, 428 Dactyle and anapestic meas-

25th, 431
ure,

609
26th, 434 Poetic accent and quantity, 614
Remarks, &c.

441-451
Secondary feet,

618
humour,

45
Poctic pauses,

623
"! charity,

455
Melody, &c.

729
contentment,

459
Remarks, &c.

632-679
common honesty, 462

APPENDIX.
mode of gaiuing know,

Book-keeping, 1st 2d and 3d
ledge,

466

kinds, 680—707
incentives to study &c. 470

Forms of notes, &c. 708–721
Purity of expression, &c. 474

Declaration independence

722
Propriety of expression, &c. 477

Constitution, U. S.

725
Precision of expression.

48!
Constitution, N. Y.

741
Synonymous terms, &c.

484
Table of fees, &c.

756
Construction of sentences,

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