Hitler's Mountain: The Führer, Obersalzberg and the American Occupation of Berchtesgaden

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McFarland, 2007 - 214 ページ
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Adolf Hitler owed his success to his remarkable ability to capture the hearts of the German people. That ability was largely due to his skill at creating a public persona, not only as a man of determination and effectiveness, but as a visionary and prophet. To develop the latter image he associated himself with the Bavarian Alps, where his retreat in Obersalzberg became almost a magical cave from which he was able, with a wave of his wand, to manipulate public opinion.
This work examines the political events that took place in Obersalzberg from the 1920s until the U.S. Army returned control of the area to the German government in 1995. Concentrating primarily on the years during which Hitler was in residence, it discusses the geography, history and climate of Berchtesgaden as well as Hitler's original acquaintance with the area. In a wider scope, however, the work focuses on the symbolism of identity and public perception as it relates to the place, setting and lifestyle of political figures. Such symbolism was especially important for Hitler as he deliberately and ruthlessly perfected his public image in his quest for control of the German government. The author addresses the threat of a final Nazi redoubt in Obersalzberg near the war's end, and follows Berchtesgaden through its military occupation after the Nazi defeat in 1945.
 

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目次

Berghof
25
Festung
48
Occupation and After 9452005
144
Notes
183
Selected Bibliography
199
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